address (pronunciación)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Diego Daniel Quispe, Oct 22, 2015.

  1. Diego Daniel Quispe Member

    Spanish-Perú
    'Address o Add'ress. I mean as a noun, because as a verb the stress is usually at the end. I think that word sounds the same as a verb and noun.

    In British english please, I think in american english the stress is on the first syllable
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2015
  2. UnchangeableName Senior Member

    English-USA-East Midland
    Accent on the first syllable for the noun.
     
  3. Quique Alfaro

    Quique Alfaro Senior Member

    Santa Fe, Argentina
    castellano
    Hola:

    Parece que como sustantivo (dirección) se puede pronunciar de las dos formas, con acento en la primera sílaba o en la segunda.

    Como verbo (dirigir; dirigirse a alguien; enfocar, tratar una cuestión) el acento iría siempre en la segunda sílaba.

    Sospecho, teniendo en cuenta la respuesta de Unchangeablename, que debe de haber diferencias regionales.

    Saludos.
     
  4. Diego Daniel Quispe Member

    Spanish-Perú
    gracias, yo igual pienso que en ingles britanico se pronuncia igual el verbo y el noun. pero no estoy seguro
     
  5. UnchangeableName Senior Member

    English-USA-East Midland
    Yeah, that's why I specify that I speak with an American East Midland accent.
     
  6. UnchangeableName Senior Member

    English-USA-East Midland
    According to Wiktionary, Received English puts the stress on the second syllable for both noun and verb. According to my American dictionary, we only put stress on the second syllable for the verb.
     
  7. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Tienes razón.:thumbsup:
     
  8. Cenzontle

    Cenzontle Senior Member

    English, U.S.
    Stress is always on the second syllable for me.
    I suspect that the difference is not simply regional, but can't say what other factors might be involved.
    I suspect that people who say "ADD-ress" for "123 Main Street" might still refer to Lincoln's "Gettysburg Ad-DRESS". (UnchangeableName?)
    Sometimes there's confusion ("Did you say 'address labels' or 'dress labels'?).
     
  9. Diego Daniel Quispe Member

    Spanish-Perú
    it's interesting what you are saying, but i'm not getting it.
     
  10. Wandering JJ

    Wandering JJ Senior Member

    England
    British English
    Just to clarify, in British English both the noun and the verb are stressed on the final syllable.
     
  11. Cenzontle

    Cenzontle Senior Member

    English, U.S.
    To clarify my statement in #8:
    In my English, both the noun and the verb are stressed on the last syllable.
    I grew up in the Upper Midwest of the U.S., but I think I hear some others from that region stressing the noun on the first syllable,
    so I don't think the difference is a matter of geographical dialect.
    "Address" as a noun has (at least) two meanings: (1) where a person lives, or where mail is delivered, or (2) a formal speech.
    In this second meaning, the U.S. President delivers a State-of-the-Union Address to Congress every year,
    and President Lincoln's most famous speech was the Gettysburg Address.
    If I'm not mistaken, with this second meaning, everyone stresses the last syllable. Am I right?
     

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