adelantado (as a noun?)

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savannah

Senior Member
English, USA
Hello to everyone!

While I spend a lot of time on the French and German boards, I've never visited the Spanish-English forum before, since I've never studied Spanish. So I have an odd request, and I hope you'll be kind enough to help me, or to point me in the right direction.

I'm translating an academic essay from French into English on the subject of European travels in the New World in the 16th century. The author seems to be using a Spanish word (which the dictionary gives as an adjective) in a noun form. I've tried to figure out how it's being used, and have checked out several of the threads on this word, but I'm afraid I simply don't read Spanish well enough to follow everything. What could this word mean in this context?

Here's the sentence, with the word in question highlighted:
En 1591, un quart de siècle après la destruction des établissements français de Floride par l'adelantado Menéndez de Avilés (septembre-octobre 1565), paraît à Francfort le second volume des Grands Voyages de Théodore de Bry...

Here's my provisional translation:
In 1591, a quarter of a century after the destruction of Florida's French settlements by l'adelantado Menéndez de Avilés in September and October of 1565, there appeared in Frankfort the second volume of The Great Voyages of Theodore de Bry...

I'd be grateful for any help. Thanks so much, y'all!

 
  • Nuwanda

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Hi

    I had never listened to this word as a noun but the dictionary of the Spanish Language Academy says that, in the past, this word was used to define the main/maximum authority (a person )of a territory:

    adelantado mayor.

    1. m. Antiguamente, autoridad máxima de un territorio.


    I hope this helps!!!
     

    savannah

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Hi

    the dictionary of the Spanish Language Academy says that, in the past, this word was used to define the main/maximum authority (a person )of a territory:

    adelantado mayor.

    1. m. Antiguamente, autoridad máxima de un territorio.
    Thank you, Nuwanda! Very helpful. So it's something like a viceroy or colonial governor, I think. That makes sense here. Again, thank you. (Gracias!)
     

    replicante7

    Senior Member
    español Cuba
    What could this word mean in this context?
    Hi, savannah.

    My English is no good. And, specially, very "slow". Then, it will be better if I simply copy what WR Dictionary says about "adelantado" (as a noun meaning something like military and political grade, maybe similar to "Major" or that sort of "titles").

    m. Antiguo cargo de gobernador militar y político de una región fronteriza:
    en el reinado de los Reyes Católicos los adelantados fueron sustituidos por los alcaldes mayores.

    Sorry! I would prefer to explain you better. Next time, I hope.;)
     

    Jenesaisrien

    Senior Member
    Buenos Aires Castellano
    The Adelantazgo is one of the institutions "transplanted" from Spain to the colonies in America/the Americas.
    During the Spanish Reconquista, the adelantados were military caudillos who led the advance of the troops of the Crown of Castile over the territories occupied by the Moorish Kingdoms and were granted the government of the newly conquered disctrics or provinces. Towards the end of the Reconquista (1492) they were replaced by Alcaldes mayores, as mentioned by replicante7.

    During the XVI century the Spanish Crown appointed "adelantados de Indias" for exploration and pacification purposes and to establish new settlements in colonial territories. The post was held for life and they had powers as Gobernador, Capitán General and Justicia Mayor.

    As the colonization process became more complex (and also with the advent of the Bourbon dynasty in Spain) so did administrative structures and this kind of "early colonization" institutions were replaced by others such as Captaincy General, Audiencia, Viceroyalty, etc.

    saludos
     

    savannah

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Jenesaisrien...

    Your name doesn't really do justice to you, does it?:)

    Thank you so much. I think that information will help me immensely as I work on this essay. I'm not an historian, so much of that was new to me. Thanks so very much, and to all the others who helped as well!
     

    Translator+Cat

    New Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hi there!

    Almost ten years later, this entry has been very useful to me. After understanding the meaning of "Adelantado" as a noun, and in my text's context, I have decided to translate it as "Lead Commander".

    "The Castellar fortress was captured by Jimena's Governor Juan de Saavedra and the Andalusian Lead Commander Diego Gómez de Ribera."

    Thank you for your help!
     
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