Adjectival modifier or subject

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yakor

Senior Member
Russian
Hi! Nouns could be used as adjectives by putting them before other nouns. For example,"This is not a translation forum". A translation is the adjeсtival phrase, modifying "forum". But there are cases when it is not clear if it is a modifier or a subject. In the song of Michael Jackson, there are lines as
"Situation Aggravation
Everybody Allegation"
...
Everybody Dog Food..."

......
It is not clear if "situation" "everybody" are modifiers or they are the subjects of the sentences, and it mean
"Situation Has Aggravation
Everybody Has Allegation"
...
Everybody Is Dog Food..."
Someone told me that Afro-American people tend not to use "has" and "is" sometimes.
<<Youtube link deleted>>
 
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  • yakor

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In many song lyrics almost anything goes, so I find your question impossible to answer, I'm afraid, Yakor.
    What does "anything goes"?:(
    I just wanted to know how to get these lines. How do you get it personally? Do Afro-American people tend not to use "has" and "is" sometimes?
     

    STINGGUY

    Senior Member
    Español
    Hi! Nouns could be used as adjectives by putting them before other nouns. For example,"This is not a translation forum". A translation is the adjeсtival phrase, modifying "forum". But there are cases when it is not clear if it is a modifier or a subject. In the song of Michael Jackson, there are lines as
    "Situation Aggravation
    Everybody Allegation"
    ...
    Everybody Dog Food..."

    ......
    It is not clear if "situation" "everybody" are modifiers or they are the subjects of the sentences, and it mean
    "Situation Has Aggravation
    Everybody Has Allegation"
    ...
    Everybody Is Dog Food..."
    Someone told me that Afro-American people tend not to use "has" and "is" sometimes.
    <<Youtube link deleted>>
    Hi yakor,

    The aggravation of the situation is driving everybody to make allegations.
    Of course the aggravation of the situation is the subject of the whole sentence. The nucleus of the subject is the noun "situation"
    without which the sentence would miss any sense. Otherwise, aggravation can be part of the subject as a prepositional complement of the nucleus.
    ...

    As for the African-American speakers, the someone who talked to you about dropping "is" and "has" was right. You might find more information
    visiting Wikipedia's web "African American Vernacular English"
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Do Afro-American people tend not to use "has" and "is" sometimes?
    Not only Afro-American people. I suppose these are examples of elision. https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/knowledge-database/elision

    I think that the song does not specify the exact relationship between situation and aggravation, or the exact relationship between everybody and allegation. It just suggests that there is a relationship.

    See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mission:_Impossible_(disambiguation)
     
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