Adjectival prepositional phrase as a noun modifier

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Rizan

Senior Member
India- Hindi
Does an adjectival prepositional phrase always immediately follow a noun phrase that it modifies? If not, could you please give an example where the above is not true? Actually I can't think of one right now. Thank you.
 
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Please give us an example of what you are calling an adjectival phrase immediately following a noun phrase – then we.may be able to think of some exceptions.
     

    Rizan

    Senior Member
    India- Hindi
    Here is an example:

    The cat on the shed is black.

    Here 'on the shed' is an adjectival prepositional phrase modifying 'the cat'. It immediately follows the noun phrase.

    Few more examples:

    I would like to buy some flowers in a glass vase.

    People from many different countries have visited this place.
     
    Last edited:

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes I would agree that I can't think of an example where they don't follow each other immediately.
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I don't see this, can you explain and identify components, please. :)
    For this production she has learned the role in Spanish.
    It seems to me that "for this production" modifies "the role" here. That is, this sentence is appropriate for answering this thread. Am I right?

    Thanks!
     
    For this production she has learned the role in Spanish.
    It seems to me that "for this production" modifies "the role" here. That is, this sentence is appropriate for answering this thread. Am I right?

    Thanks!
    OK. There are a number of cases where moving a prepositional phrase to initial position fulfills the criteria of the OP, i.e. that the phrase is adjectival and NOT immediately following. "In a terrible state, he managed to escape.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    For this production she has learned the role in Spanish.
    It seems to me that "for this production" modifies "the role" here. That is, this sentence is appropriate for answering this thread. Am I right?

    Thanks!
    In this sentence 'for this production' functions adverbially, modifying 'has learned', not 'role' -- in my opinion.
     
    Interesting point. I think the ambiguity is found in a number of sentences, e.g. He came to the the party in a disheveled state.

    How does one decide?

    At this site-- English Grammar 101 - Prepositions, Lesson 8: Adjective or Adverb Prepositional Phrases

    --is the following comment and example:

    Hint: Sometimes a prepositional phrase could make sense either as an adjective phrase modifying the noun before it or as an adverb phrase modifying the verb. In this case, it is usually considered an adjective phrase.

    The plant \in the window gets lots of sunlight. (Tells which plant.)
    \In the window, the plant gets lots of sunlight. (Tells where the plant gets lots of sunlight.)
     
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