Adjective Complement

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Wilde Rover

New Member
Italian
Hello everybody ;)


May anyone explain to me the difference beetween the following sentences if any, please ?


I really need an help because i'm totally confused about these so called "Adjective Complement"
sentences .


I am so happy to hear you are healthy again!
I'm so happy that I hear you are healthy again!


I'm happy to be single.
I'm happy that I'm single.


I'm glad to have my independence to do what I want to
I'm glad I have my independence to do what I want to.


I'm sure that I've turned the Tv off.
I'm sure to have turned the Tv off.


I was surprised to see him doing that.
I was surprised that I saw him doing that.


I'm sorry to have seen her crying.
I'm sorry that I have seen her crying.


I'm delighted to have met you.
I'm delighted I've met you.


Thank you all for helping :)


Wilde Rover​
 
  • AlabamaBoy

    Senior Member
    American English
    I am so happy to hear you are healthy again!
    I'm so happy that I hear you are healthy again! "heard" is better than hear because it must have already occurred


    I'm happy to be single.
    I'm happy that I'm single.


    I'm glad to have my independence to do what I want to
    I'm glad I have my independence to do what I want to.


    I'm sure that I've turned the Tv off.
    I'm sure to have turned the Tv off. This does not work at all (or at least is sounds very unusual to me), because "to be sure to do something" is an idiom meaning "to take care that something is done without fail"


    I was surprised to see him doing that.
    I was surprised that I saw him doing that.


    I'm sorry to have seen her crying.
    I'm sorry that I have seen her crying.


    I'm delighted to have met you.
    I'm delighted I've met you.

    Except as noted in red, the meaning of the infinitive construction and the subordinate clause construction is indistinguishable in my opinion. I think that more often than not, the infinitive is the preferred construction because it uses fewer words.
     

    flaze

    Member
    English -UK
    Thankyou so much for the prompt and exhaustive replay :)
    I would add that since adjective complements can be prepositional phrases or noun clauses, you're merely alternating between the two.

    For instance:

    It is obvious (adj.) that you like English = noun phrase

    She's silly (adj.) to ignore you = prepositional phrase.

    Both are correct :)
     
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