Adjective for "subjectively interpreted"

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
"If you are asked by the person who takes the appointment why you're bringing your child in, and you reply that your child has flu-like symptoms or a stomachache, the person will block you in for a certain amount of time with the doctor. If, after your child has been examined, you start talking about the sore ankle, the fever blister, etc., what you're interpreting as the "evil eye" may be stress because the necessary amount of time was not allotted and the doctor will be behind schedule for the rest of the day."

the part that says "what you're interpreting [ ] as" can be written another way in one adjective. This adjective means how an action or act is felt by the person whom is subjected to them, and it may not be true because it's just the person's subjective interpretation. Would you help with recalling this word? It can be put this way: "If, after your child has been examined, you start talking about the sore ankle, the fever blister, etc., the doctor's [adjective] "evil eye" may be stress."

source: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/koreati...printpreview.asp?nmode=3&idx=987&gotopage=117
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The adjective is "apparent", but this isn't nearly as good as "what you're interpreting as".

    There is a lot of nuance in English. To say "the doctor's apparent evil eye" (which, incidentally, you would not put in inverted commas with "apparent"), suggests that the doctor's "evil eye" might be real. Saying "what you're interpreting as the "evil eye"" strongly suggests that the doctor is giving you nothing of the sort and you are just imagining it as the evil eye.
     
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