adjective from wine

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piesocnica

New Member
slovak
Hello,

i need your help. I can´t find adjective form from words as wine, vineyard or viticulture. I would like to translate: Bergbuch - the oldest wine book.

Thank you.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    'Wine book' is best. English often uses nouns instead of adjectives, and there is no common adjective of 'wine' for general use. (There are rare words like oenological, but you don't want them in ordinary text.)
     

    piesocnica

    New Member
    slovak
    I wasn´t sure, if - wine book is correct or not, because i couldn´t find in my dictionary adjective form of wine. Now it is clear to me.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Nouns don't need to be entered separately in dictionaries with an adjective use, because virtually all nouns can be used as modifiers instead of adjectives: vineyard management; book production; viticulture experts; dictionary definition . . . Of those, only one has any obvious equivalent using an adjective, viticultural experts. Often noun + noun is the only natural way to say it.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Bacchus was the God of wine; Dionysius was the Greek equivalent (I think).

    In any case I have heard of both Bacchalian and Dionysian revelry (meaning drunken bashes, high on wine), so as an adjective either would work. But as a means of communicating effectively "wine" wins.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hello,

    i need your help. I can´t find adjective form from words as wine, vineyard or viticulture. I would like to translate: Bergbuch - the oldest wine book.
    It depends what aspects of wine (growing, making, types of wine, etc.) the book addresses - "The oldest book on viticulture" is a possibility.
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I've heard of Bacchanalian revelry, but not Bacchalian.

    Ws:)
    I was typing while reveling. I stand (barely) corrected.

    According to the Encyclopedia Mythica things have been going downhill since 186 B.C. (Ahh, the good old days.)

    The Roman god of wine and intoxication, equated with the Greek Dionysus. His festival was celebrated on March 16 and 17. The Bacchanalia, orgies in honor of Dionysus, were introduced in Rome around 200 BCE. These infamous celebrations, notorious for their sexual and criminal character, got so out of hand that they were forbidden by the Roman Senate in 186 BCE. Bacchus is also identified with the old-Italian god Liber.

    According to Wiki "Liber" was the god of viticulture.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liber

    In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Liber ("the free one"), also known as Liber Pater ("the free Father") was a god of viticulture and wine, fertility and freedom...
     
    Last edited:
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