adjective used as verb

Yoshihiro

Member
Japanese
I know that busy is usually used as adjective but can use as verb like (1).
(1) She busied herself in checking proofs.

I didn't think it can apply to all adjectives.

But I found the following sentence. Is it generally possible to use adjective as verb? If possible, can you give me more examples?
(2) Verna paper-maches Griffin to hide him from an angry mob who believe he's responsible for a string of break-ins
After Hours (1985, Martin Scorsese) – Brandon's movie memory
 
  • Grayzee

    Member
    English - south of England
    It can apply to nouns too. When Google first appeared in the world, it was the name (a proper noun) for a search engine company. Now it's become a verb because now we Google something - whereas we don't Yahoo it or Bing it.
     

    Yoshihiro

    Member
    Japanese
    It can't.

    Paper-mache (Papier-mâché) is primarily a noun.
    I looked into my dictionary and found this sentence. So I thought it could use as adjective.
    a papier-mache façade of friendship

    Then in (2) paper-mache is noun but used as verb?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Then in (2) paper-mache is noun but used as verb?
    Yes. This practice of changing nouns into verbs is commoner in AE - There is an American saying "There ain't no noun that can't be verbed." :D (The saying is not true, but it is a broad generalisation.)
     

    Grayzee

    Member
    English - south of England
    Incidentally, I've just checked the online Cambridge Dictionary and busy is listed first as an adjective then as a verb meaning to make the time pass by doing something.
     

    Grayzee

    Member
    English - south of England
    Yes but once again this is making a verb out of a noun. In "The team scored ten runs" the word run is a noun. So we ten-runned 'em is using the noun as a verb. By the way, this seems a very American expression. You wouldn't hear many English using this expression!
     

    Yoshihiro

    Member
    Japanese
    Yes but once again this is making a verb out of a noun. In "The team scored ten runs" the word run is a noun. So we ten-runned 'em is using the noun as a verb. By the way, this seems a very American expression. You wouldn't hear many English using this expression!
    Thank you for you reply, Grayzee!
     
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