Adjectives with لا النافية للجنس

Eternal student

Senior Member
English - London
Hello everyone,

Something I've often wondered is whether the noun after the laa of absolute negation (لا لنفي الجنس) can be modified by an adjective, and, if so, whether that adjective should have tanwiin or not. For example, if I want to use this construction to translate 'it has no basis', I could say

لا أساسَ لها

But what if I want to say 'it has no scientific basis'. Is it possible to add the adjective علمي to this construction?

لا أساسَ علميَ\علمياً لها

Or would you be forced to place علمياً at the end as a tamyiiz?

Thanks.
 
  • barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    Yes, you can add an adjective to the اسم of لا النافية للجنس. Your example is correct.
     

    dkarjala

    Senior Member
    English - America
    Hello everyone,

    Something I've often wondered is whether the noun after the laa of absolute negation (لا لنفي الجنس) can be modified by an adjective, and, if so, whether that adjective should have tanwiin or not. For example, if I want to use this construction to translate 'it has no basis', I could say

    لا أساسَ لها

    But what if I want to say 'it has no scientific basis'. Is it possible to add the adjective علمي to this construction?

    لا أساسَ علميَ\علمياً لها

    Or would you be forced to place علمياً at the end as a tamyiiz?

    Thanks.
    Check out this page. Look at footnote number 2 at the bottom as well as the entire first section (Syria has the whole kitaab al-kafaaf online and it's pretty great to look through). As you will see if you look, you can put an adjective with the negated noun either with or without tanwiin. The only time tanwiin is required is on the noun in some cases; this happens when the noun you are negating is a participle taking a direct object later in the clause. Even then, though, the adjective can remain without nunation.
     
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    Eternal student

    Senior Member
    English - London
    Excellent. Many thanks both. I realise this is an empirical question, which perhaps I could look into properly if I had the time, but I was wondering if anyone had a sense of how common this is. My impression (which could very easily be mistaken) is that modification by an adjective of ism laa n-naafia lil-jins is less common than adjectival modification of ordinary nouns. What do you think?
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    But what if I want to say 'it has no scientific basis'. Is it possible to add the adjective علمي to this construction?

    لا أساسَ علميَ\علمياً لها
    Can anyone attest this with a quotation from a classical author? I only know things like lā rajula qāʼimun “there is no man standing”, where the complement is in the nominative.
     

    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    In لا رجلَ قائمٌ, the complement is قائم (as if you're saying: no man is standing). In لا أساسَ لها, the complement is لها (as if you're saying literally: no basis is to it), or, as some prefer to say, the complement is an omitted موجود (as if you're saying: لا أساسَ موجودٌ لها, no basis is existing to it). When the word "scientific" is added as an adjective, the meaning becomes literally: no scientific basis is (existing) to it.

    If you want to consider "scientific" as the complement, then لا أساسَ علميٌّ لها would mean literally: no basis is scientific to it.

    Almost the same thing :)
     

    barkoosh

    Senior Member
    Arabic - Lebanon
    The case of النعت of اسم لا النافية للجنس is very complicated (It's explained here.) No wonder people would rather say لا يوجد أساس علميّ.
    Based on what the reference says, you can say لا أساسَ علميَّ (موجودٌ) لها if you consider النعت as مبني على الفتح, as in the example لا تاجرَ خدّاعَ ناجحٌ.

    EDIT: also see here.
    "لا رجلَ قبيحاً، أو قبيحَ، أو قبيحٌ، عندنا"
     
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