Adjectives

L_L

Senior Member
Mexico, Spanish-English
There's a rule about possessive nouns that become adjectives. It says that if after ir, comes a noun, it's an adjective like in.- This is Kate's house. Kate's is modifying home, and it's answering the question whose?
But if you say.- This house is Kate's. You don't have any noun after Kate's, but for me is an adjective. Someone could say me if I am right or wrong?
 
  • Rebecca Hendry

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom - English
    L_L said:
    There's a rule about possessive nouns that become adjectives. It says that if after ir, comes a noun, it's an adjective like in.- This is Kate's house. Kate's is modifying home, and it's answering the question whose?
    But if you say.- This house is Kate's. You don't have any noun after Kate's, but for me is an adjective. Someone could say me if I am right or wrong?
    No estoy del todo segura de lo que intentas decir, pero te pondré en inglés y en español los ejemplos que has dado:



    Whose house is this? It’s Kate’s.

    ¿De quién es esta casa? Es de Kate.



    Si te estás referiendo a significado de “Kate’s” en inglés, quiere decir “it is of Kate” (literalmente) o “pertenece a Kate”.



    No sé si te sirve de ayuda..... :confused:
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    L_L said:
    There's a rule about possessive nouns that become adjectives. It says that if after ir, comes a noun, it's an adjective like in.- This is Kate's house. Kate's is modifying home, and it's answering the question whose?
    But if you say.- This house is Kate's. You don't have any noun after Kate's, but for me is an adjective. Someone could say me if I am right or wrong?
    I think it's better to distinguish between adjectives and the possessive case.

    What you have in those expressions is the possessive case, which in English is done by adding -'s to nouns.

    Here are examples of adjectivized nouns: computer programmer, shoe shop, Boston University, backseat driver, Sunday school, home schooling, water cooler, air conditioning.

    Possessive forms indicate ownership: "Kate's house" means that Kate lives in the house. When a noun modifies another noun, working as an adjective, it denotes some kind of relation, but not necessarily possession: the computer programmer is not owned by the computer, the shoe shop is not owned by the shoe, a backseat driver does not belong to the backseat...
     

    L_L

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    You haven't gotten my question. Kate's is a possessive adjective, because it answers the question whose. My question is, in both cases are they possessive adjectives?
     

    funnydeal

    Senior Member
    Mexico / Español
    L_L said:
    You haven't gotten my question. Kate's is a possessive adjective, because it answers the question whose. My question is, in both cases are they possessive adjectives?
    Perhaps I am not able to understand right your question in English.

    Would you please try to post it in Spanish? So I might be able to get the answer you are requesting.
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    L_L said:
    There's a rule about possessive nouns that become adjectives. It says that if after ir, comes a noun, it's an adjective like in.- This is Kate's house. Kate's is modifying home, and it's answering the question whose?
    But if you say.- This house is Kate's. You don't have any noun after Kate's, but for me is an adjective.
    I would agree.

    "This is Kate's house." = "This is the house of Kate."
    "This house is Kate's." = "This house is of Kate."

    In both sentences, "of Kate" is an adjective.
     

    Rayines

    Senior Member
    Castellano/Argentina
    funnydeal, L L pregunta:
    Decir "This is Kate's house" es lo mismo que decir "This house is Kate's"
    Él/ella opina que Kate's , en el 1er. caso, es / actúa como adjetivo posesivo, y pregunta si en el segundo caso, también lo es. (En esto no me meto porque bastante tengo con la gramática en español; pero sólo se me ocurre un ejemplo parecido: "This is your pencil"; "This pencil is yours". Then, your y yours, son adjetivo posesivo?...) Es algo así? :idea:
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Rayines said:
    "This is your pencil"; "This pencil is yours".
    Excellent example, Rayines. "Your" and "yours" are traditionally classified as a possessive adjective and a possessive pronoun, respectively. Hmm...
     

    L_L

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Spanish-English
    Thank you very much for your answers, I think the same as you do, in both cases are adjectives, but according to my Language book, because it came the answers a few pages after, It's not the same.
    This is Kate's house <--Possessive adjective
    This house is Kate's<---Possesive noun
     
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