adman

marianasilva

Member
portuguese - portugal
Hello everyone!

Which is used more often in english from the UK : adman or advertising person?

Do you think the following phrases are correct?


...which father was the adman of the clothes ads.

...which father was the adman who signed the clothes ads.

Many thanks

 
  • cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Welcome to the forum, marianasilva.

    Hello everyone!
    Which is used more often in English from the UK : adman or advertising person?
    Do you think the following phrases are correct?
    ...which father was the adman of the clothes ads.
    ...which father was the adman who signed the clothes ads.
    Simply, no. But the errors don't hinge on the word, "adman"—which is perfectly acceptable in most cases.
    "Which" should be "whose" in both cases, unless you have further context which might apply.
    Do you really mean "signed," or "designed"?
    "Advertising person" sounds a bit too convoluted for my taste.
     

    marianasilva

    Member
    portuguese - portugal
    Thanks a lot for your opinion. It really helped. Definetly is " whose " and not "which".

    By signed I meant the person who developed the ad.

    So maybe I´ll just write instead: ...whose father was the adman for the clothes ad.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    ...whose father was the adman for the clothes ad.
    We wouldn't say "adman for the ad" because (1) "adman" just means a male who works in the advertising business and (2) the fact that he is an adman tells us nothing about his connection with the ad. If you want to explain his role, you would be specific: he designed the ad, or he wrote the copy for the ad, or he placed the ad . . .
     

    marianasilva

    Member
    portuguese - portugal
    We wouldn't say "adman for the ad" because (1) "adman" just means a male who works in the advertising business and (2) the fact that he is an adman tells us nothing about his connection with the ad. If you want to explain his role, you would be specific: he designed the ad, or he wrote the copy for the ad, or he placed the ad . . .
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Adman sounds thoroughly old-fashioned to my ears. I don't mean "sexist," either - I mean old-fashioned as in "outmoded" or "outdated." Well, for one thing, the advertising and PR fields are rapidly becoming dominated by women. The last figures I saw showed that something like 70 percent of those getting degrees in these fields are women.

    For another thing, I don't even know what that term means now. I know what it meant in 1967, so if I was making a historical reference, I might use it, in which case it might be fine to use in relation to somebody's father. But under all other circumstances, I would always use the actual job title, e.g., "My father was the designer of the clothing ads" (or whatever his job actually was) or I'd describe his specific job, e.g., "My father designed the clothing ads" or "My father was the one who came up with the concept of the clothing ads."
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    JustKate, the question was if it is used in BE. It is, and up to recent times as well, if this article from The Guardian (2008) is anything to go by.:) Admittedly, to call the gent in question ad adman could be a little....tongue-in-cheek, but they also use it here (adslogans.co.uk) on a 2013 website .;)

    I agree however that most lady advertisers would probably be very put out if you were to refer to them as 'admen' (I certainly would be), so I had a hunt around to find out what they call themselves and discovered a website called adwomen.org, so there you go.;)
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    JustKate, the question was if it is used in BE. It is, and up to recent times as well, if this article from The Guardian (2008) is anything to go by.:) Admittedly, to call the gent in question ad adman could be a little....tongue-in-cheek, but they also use it here (adslogans.co.uk) on a 2013 website .;)

    I agree however that most lady advertisers would probably be very put out if you were to refer to them as 'admen' (I certainly would be), so I had a hunt around to find out what they call themselves and discovered a website called adwomen.org, so there you go.;)
    I know that the question was specifically in reference to BE, and that's why I held off answering for a while. But considering the degree to which this field is becoming dominated by women (and I do mean dominated), I didn't want Mariana to think that it's a good, general term, because it really isn't. It's OK in reference to a specific male who identifies with this title, but that's about it. And aside from the problems with man, it no longer has any real meaning within the industry. Adman, when it was used, was a general job title, but like so many other fields, advertising is now very specialized. People sell advertising, people design ads, people place ads, but these are not all the same people doing these different jobs.
     

    marianasilva

    Member
    portuguese - portugal
    hi,

    Justkate and londoncalling, you both help me a lot, as you Know english is not my first language. In fact, my main question was if adman was used or not in BE and in my text I want to refer to someone´s father, so a man...but I´m also interest in Knowing if it is old-fashioned or not, so it was good and helpfull to read both opinions.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top