administer oaths and affirmations

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AlwaysLearner

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello,

Again from this Letter from the Office of Secretary of State of an American State, in my hand.

Part of it says:
"to administer oaths and affirmations in all matters incident to the duties of the office or to be used before any court, judge, officer, or board."

There are three ways of understanding among us.
The first is "notarize oaths and affirmations",
the second is "hold oath and affirmation ceremonies",
the third is "hold oath and confirm statement".
( In reality, I have seen what Notary mainly does, they notarize documents, but I never see them notarize oaths and affirmations, or hold oath or affirmation ceremonies. So I am confused.)

Thank you for your help.
 
Last edited:
  • fiercediva

    Senior Member
    American English
    In Montana's explanation of a notary's powers, it gives further explanation:

    "A notary may administer an official oath, either as part of a written statement (JURAT), or as a separate act. There is no statutorily mandated language for such oaths, but a generally accepted statement would be: 'Do you swear or affirm that the statement you have made (or contained in this document) is true and correct to the best of your knowledge and ability?' ”
     

    fiercediva

    Senior Member
    American English
    Then, what is "administer affirmation"?
    From the National Notary Association's site:

    "[An affirmation] is a pledge on one's personal honor. Both [oaths and affirmations] are legally binding promises to tell the truth and subject the oath-taker or affirmant to penalties for perjury. It is customary for the Notary to ask the oath-taker or affirmant to raise the right hand in a pledging gesture or to place it over one's heart. Oaths and affirmations should be always be taken seriously by the Notary and the person being sworn or affirmed."
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    To expand on fiercediva's answer, an affirmation is the equivalent of an oath, taken by someone with a religious objection to taking oaths.
     
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