Admission is free - events are chargeable

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.

Admission to the British Museum is free but the special event 'Ming - 50 that changed China' is chargeable for non-members.

I am not sure if I used the adjective chargeable correctly in the sentence above.
I want to say that although entrance to the museum is free, you have to buy a ticket for a special exhibition if you are not a member.

Thank you.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Admission to the British Museum is free, but there is a charge for non-members for the special exhibit "Ming – 50 that changed China.'
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If there is a single charge, rather than different charges for students, seniors, etc., you can put that in. If not, don't bother.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I think the most common use for this word is by lawyers racking up their bills, it does not quite fit in the sense of admission charges. Odd, perhaps, but true!
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think that suzi was saying that 'chargeable' is a rather imposing word that's used by lawyers and tax specialists and therefore doesn't sit well in your context.

    I may be misreading suzi, but if I'm not, then I agree with her. :)
     

    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    The word chargeable is sometimes used about exhibitions in museums and galleries, as a search for chargeable exhibitions reveals :) .
     

    Szkot

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Since it is the season of goodwill :):

    Free tickets to chargeable exhibitions (National Railway Museum)

    Didn't bother with the chargeable exhibitions since we arrived there rather late and was nearing their closing time (Tripadvisor)

    Free, some events may be chargeable. (Royal Armories, Leeds (part of the Greater Northallerton Metropolitan Area, I believe))
     
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