admission to the bar

rantran

Member
English
Est-ce quelqu'un sait comment on dirait "admission to the bar" en francais? Il s'agit de quand un avocat a le droit de pratiquer sa profession. Ce n'est pas "admission au barreau," n'est-ce pas? Merci.
 
  • anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    Bonjour, :)

    Je pense que ce terme est correct. L'expression ''être admis au barreau'' est bien courante concernant les avocats, donc j'imagine que cela marcherait.
    Dans quel contexte voulez-vous l'utiliser, ou bien quelle est toute la phrase d'origine ?
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    Bonjour, :)

    Je pense que ce terme est correct. L'expression ''être admis au barreau'' est bien courante concernant les avocats, donc j'imagine que cela marcherait.
    Dans quel contexte voulez-vous l'utiliser, ou bien quelle est toute la phrase d'origine ?
    Bonjour anangelaway,

    in American English, when we say that someone "was admitted to the bar", it means that the person has received a degree in law and has passed the qualifying tests to practice the profession of law.
     

    rantran

    Member
    English
    Bonjour anangelaway,

    in American English, when we say that someone "was admitted to the bar", it means that the person has received a degree in law and has passed the qualifying tests to practice the profession of law.

    Is this not true in French (when you say someone is "inscrit au barreau")?
     

    rantran

    Member
    English
    Or to put this a different way, would it be odd to speak of "applying for admission to the bar" in French as "faire une demande d'inscription au barreau?" In English this is perfectly normal, while in French - if what Tonton is saying is right - this would make no sense: one could simply go and s'inscrire au barreau, without having to apply.
     

    multae gentes

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    In France, the phrase "s'inscrire au barreau" does not mean that you take and pass a degree.

    If you already have the required qualifications ("certificat d'aptitude à la profession d'avocat"ou CAPA, I believe), you can submit an application to any bar (there are many local bars) and be almost automatically admitted, but you have to select one bar (only) before beginning to practice.
     

    rantran

    Member
    English
    Similar in the US: you take the bar exam of a particular jurisdiction, but you take an exam as part of your application for admission to that bar - so each bar has a different exam. That exam is really 95% of the application, the rest is mostly paperwork and occasionally a 'character interview' to prove you are not a heinous person, etc.
     

    watergirl

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.A.
    "Admission" implique une manière de sélection. On dit, en général, qu'un avocat est inscrit au barreau de telle ou telle ville.
    Maybe the difference is that "inscrit au barreau" is the equivalent of being "A MEMBER of such and such a bar" (as we say in AE); whereas "admis au barreau" puts the emphasis on the act of having passed the test you need to take in order to become "inscrit"? Two separate, though related, ideas.
     

    marget

    Senior Member
    In France, the phrase "s'inscrire au barreau" does not mean that you take and pass a degree.

    If you already have the required qualifications ("certificat d'aptitude à la profession d'avocat"ou CAPA, I believe), you can submit an application to any bar (there are many local bars) and be almost automatically admitted, but you have to select one bar (only) before beginning to practice.
    In the US, I believe admission to the bar is generally granted on a state-by-state basis and one must pass a test for many states, if not each state, or be waived in based on reciprocity agreements, in order to practice in a particular venue.
     

    rantran

    Member
    English
    In the US, I believe admission to the bar is generally granted on a state-by-state basis and one must pass a test for many states, if not each state, or be waived in based on reciprocity agreements, in order to practice in a particular venue.
    And then even within states, higher courts may require a separate bar admission in order for a lawyer to appear before them.
     
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