admit to having started/starting

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
http://www.capetimes.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=3531&fArticleId=qw999536822122B213

This is an interview from a winner of World Oyster Opening Championship. He talked about his feeling and what he had done before the competition:

"The trick was to swallow straight away, don't chew them and don't put too many at once in your mouth," carpenter John Wright from Chertsey, in the southern English county of Surrey, said after the event.
"Once it was all over I had to have a Mars bar," he added, admitting to having started the day with a burger breakfast.

I don't understand why present perfect is used in this sentence.
In this case, is it just because having a burger breakfast is before the competition , present perfect tense is used?
 
  • audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    http://www.capetimes.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=3531&fArticleId=qw999536822122B213

    This is an interview from a winner of World Oyster Opening Championship. He talked about his feeling and what he had done before the competition:

    "The trick was to swallow straight away, don't chew them and don't put too many at once in your mouth," carpenter John Wright from Chertsey, in the southern English county of Surrey, said after the event.
    "Once it was all over I had to have a Mars bar," he added, admitting to having started the day with a burger breakfast.

    I don't understand why present perfect is used in this sentence.
    In this case, is it just because having a burger breakfast is before the competition , present perfect tense is used?
    Hello,

    I would not say it is the present perfect tense; it is having + past participle. Yes, it is used to lay stress that it happened before something else. And the starting form is also acceptable, I think.

    But I am not a native speaker, so you had better wait for other more educated forum users.:D
     

    lonelily22

    Member
    USA
    USA English
    Yes, redgiant, this tense is used because it is implied that the burger breakfast occurred before the contest.
    You can even switch the sentence around...
    "Having started his day with a burger breakfast, John Wright competed in the World Oyster Opening Championship."
     

    przemo84

    Senior Member
    "(...)The verb + -ing and verb + having + past participle forms have a similar meaning with these verbs. Compare:

    I now regret buying the car. and I now regret having bought the car.

    This form is most often used with the verbs admit, deny, forget, recall, regret and remember."

    Martin Hevings, "Advanced Grammar in Use", Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition, Unit 31, page 62, point C
     
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