Adult education program [used in Spoken English]

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Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,


My question is: are the usages below of "adult education program" appropriate in spoken English or are they used only in wittten language?

a. He is in an adult education program. He wants to get his high school diploma.
b. He will get into an adult education program to get his diploma.
c. He finished an adult education program and got his diploma.

Context of "adult education'': Many adults around the nation have not finished their high school education. Adult education is the way for those adults who did not finish high school to get their high school diploma (GED) and continue on with their lives. [newyorkschools.com/articles/why-adult-education-is-important.html]


Thank you in advance!
 
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    Adult education program is fine in both spoken and written English. Can you tell us why you thought it might not be appropriate for spoken English?

    It doesn't always refer to a program that helps adults get their diplomas, though it can. It can refer to any educational program geared primarily for people older than typical high school or college age. A person can take a course in pottery and it might be called "adult education."
     

    pob14

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree with Kate. The adult education department at my local community college includes GED, literacy, and the pottery-type classes Kate mentions. (There's no distinction between its use in writing and in speech that I'm aware of.)
     

    Xavier da Silva

    Senior Member
    Adult education program is fine in both spoken and written English. Can you tell us why you thought it might not be appropriate for spoken English?
    I thought my uses weren't appropriate for spoken English because "adult education program" seemed to be too long and technical for conversation. But now I know I can use those sentences, can't I?

    It doesn't always refer to a program that helps adults get their diplomas, though it can. It can refer to any educational program geared primarily for people older than typical high school or college age. A person can take a course in pottery and it might be called "adult education."
    Excellent informatiion. I needed to know it.

    Thank you very much for your answers.​
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Yes, the use of adult education program in all three of those sentences is fine. #2 is just a little bit odd, but the problem isn't with adult education program. The problem is that there's something odd with the verb. There's nothing wrong with talking about how someone will get into a program, but "get into a program" normally means "get accepted into a program," and I don't think that's what you mean. Maybe something like, "He will get his diploma through an adult education program."

    The other two are fine as is, though.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English


    I thought my uses weren't appropriate for spoken English because "adult education program" seemed to be too long and technical for conversation. But now I know I can use those sentences, can't I?



    Excellent informatiion. I needed to know it.

    Thank you very much for your answers.​

    I taught photography in Adult Education and conversationally it was called "Adult Ed".
     
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