Adult Education

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Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,


Considering the context: ''In California, adult education is designed to meet the elementary and secondary educational needs of adults who are 18 years of age and older.''[www.lmusd.org]

Is it appropriate to say "(get) in adult education" ?

Ex.: He's in adult education.
Ex.: He will get into adult education.

Meaning intended: receiving adult education, will receive adult education [education after you're somewhat older than normal]

Thank you in advance!

 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Sorry, Xavier, but that doesn't look right to my Oregon-based eye (and I've spent a lot of time studying things, e.g. languages in so-called "adult education" programs, including Portuguese :)).

    As such, it seems as though you're talking about somebody setting up adult-education programs.

    We don't "receive adult education" around here. We might study in classes designed for adults, but there's no course of study for us old folks called "adult education."

    Edit:
    I must confess it surprised me a bit. I'd thought these examples I created were unnatural.
    From an AE standpoint, at least, your first impression was spot-on.:)
     
    Last edited:

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm sure those examples would not be typical or 'natural' in British English either.

    It depends what meaning you are trying to communicate.

    The term "adult education" is an orgaizational arrangement. An adult education centre offers various subjects and activities. Each of the courses would have its own specific title.
    If I heard someone "is in adult education" I would infer they worked in that field, just as someone might say "I'm in marketing".

    If someone said "I'm doing an adult education course" I would immediately ask what subject they were studying.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    considering the context: ''in california, adult education is designed to meet the elementary and secondary educational needs of adults who are 18 years of age and older.''[www.lmusd.org]

    is it appropriate to say "(get) in adult education" ?

    Ex.: He's in adult education.
    Ex.: He will get into adult education.

    meaning intended: Receiving adult education, will receive adult education [education after you're somewhat older than normal]
    No. In the U.S., we would say:
    He's taking Adult Ed courses.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    No. In the U.S., we would say:
    He's taking Adult Ed courses.
    Lest the OP be misled, it should be pointed out that the shortening of "education" to "ed" is highly informal and not universal.

    The usage seems to be more prevalent among American educators, who live in a world of jargon.

    The "we" in this post, for example, does not include "me."
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Lest the OP be misled, it should be pointed out that the shortening of "education" to "ed" is highly informal and not universal.

    The usage seems to be more prevalent among American educators, who live in a world of jargon.

    The "we" in this post, for example, does not include "me."
    My apologies for including you in something you wish to be no part of.
    I think I felt prompted to write "in the U.S." as a reaction to the post by BE speaker Suzi br, who thought the OP's two suggestions sounded fine.

    I should have specified that "Adult ed" is colloquial. I'm not sure I agree that it's "highly informal."
    My personal observation/experience has been that most people (not just educators) use "adult ed" or "continuing ed" in spoken conversation.
    In writing, which is, of course, more formal, I would use the whole word.
     
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