Advance to 9pm (more informal expression?)

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givelove

Senior Member
Chinese - Hong Kong Cantonese
I would like to change the starting time of an event from 10pm to 9pm. I need would like to use “advance” as the verb for this expression but it seems too formal. Is there another verb/phrasal verb which is informal for this expression? Thanks.

Example:
I would like to advance the start time to 9pm.
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    No ambiguity for me:
    “move up”: move to an earlier time
    “push back”: move to a later time
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    No ambiguity for me:
    “move up”: move to an earlier time
    “push back”: move to a later time
    Yes, for you there isn't.;)

    We don't use 'move up' at all (or let's say I've never heard it said or seen it written by a fellow Brit and some may well not know what it means), although I have heard 'push back'. All speakers of English understand what to 'change the time of a meeting from 10 to 9' means, though.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    “change” is ambiguous; it’s only disambiguated by the specific times given.

    Similarly, if someone didn’t know “move up” (or “bring forward” or “push back”), they would presumably figure out the meaning based on the times given.

    givelove can use “move up” if they want to use US English and “bring forward” if they want to use UK English.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    They want to use a verb that specifically refers to moving the meeting to an earlier time.

    This is hardly the first time we’ve seen a US/UK difference. Do we recommend that users use “during the weekend” so they don’t have to choose between “on the weekend” and “at the weekend”? :confused:
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    They want to use a verb that specifically refers to moving the meeting to an earlier time.

    This is hardly the first time we’ve seen a US/UK difference. Do we recommend that users use “during the weekend” so they don’t have to choose between “on the weekend” and “at the weekend”? :confused:
    No, of course not, because we all know what they mean. Not so in this case, so it's better to use something everyone is sure to understand.
     

    givelove

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Hong Kong Cantonese
    "bring forward" includes more meaning than "change". It seems better to use a word with more meaning.

    I just checked the dictionary. It seems that "bring forward" is more common than "move up" when using for the situation concerned.

    Bring forward --- includes the meaning concerned:
    bring something ↔ forward | meaning of bring something ↔ forward in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English | LDOCE

    Move up --- does not have the meaning concerned:
    move up | meaning of move up in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English | LDOCE
     
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