advance

dhejejjeskms

Senior Member
Korean
Hello, everyone.

I was slightly confused because there seemed to be many different meanings the word "advance" have.
Would you explain about that?
(It is from an ABC news article.)

The Prime Minister did not specifically discuss climate change in his Chicago speech, but he said China should come under the same environmental obligations as other developed nations.

Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese said he did not agree with Mr Morrison's assessment of China, and suggested that the Prime Minister's decision to make the call from the United States muddied the message he was trying to send.

"If he is sending China a message from Chicago then that's a message perhaps, if it was going to be advanced, would have been better sent from Australia so there was no confusion that the Prime Minister was advancing Australia's national interest," he said.

Thank you very much.
 
  • S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English

    1. to bring into consideration;
      suggest;
      propose:[~ + object]advanced a proposal for a tax cut.
    2. [~ + object]to further the development, progress, or prospects of:to advance one's interests.
    The first use is definition #2, and the second is def #3
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "If he is sending China a message from Chicago then that's a message perhaps, if it was going to be advanced, would have been better sent from Australia so there was no confusion that the Prime Minister was advancing Australia's national interest," he said.
    The sentence has its problems.

    "if it was going to be advanced" means "if the message was going to be given to China."
    I think there's a "which" missing.
    "If he is sending China a message from Chicago then that's a message perhaps, if it was going to be advanced, which would have been better sent from Australia so there was no confusion that the Prime Minister was advancing Australia's national interest," he said.
    "If he is sending China a message from Chicago then that's a message perhaps, if it was going to be advanced, which would have been better sent from Australia so there was no confusion that the Prime Minister was advancing Australia's national interest," he said.
    The sentence still has to read correctly if the blue part is omitted.

    Even then, it is hard to understand the logic of "If he is sending a message from Chicago .... then it should have been sent from Australia."

    It would be better as "If he is sending China a message, then he should send it from Australia, not Chicago."

    Cross-posted with S1m0n. with whom I agree.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I don't think "which" works in that spot by itself but I agree that there are serious logical/grammatical problems with the sentence. I think a few more changes are needed.

    "If he was sending China a message from Chicago then that was a message perhaps, if it was going to be advanced*, which would have been better sent from Australia so there was no confusion that the Prime Minister was advancing Australia's national interest," he said.

    * his comments presume it was advanced and it's not really a case of "if"
     

    dhejejjeskms

    Senior Member
    Korean

    1. to bring into consideration;
      suggest;
      propose:[~ + object]advanced a proposal for a tax cut.
    2. [~ + object]to further the development, progress, or prospects of:to advance one's interests.
    The first use is definition #2, and the second is def #3
    Thank you so much, S1m0n.

    The sentence has its problems.

    "if it was going to be advanced" means "if the message was going to be given to China."
    I think there's a "which" missing.


    The sentence still has to read correctly if the blue part is omitted.

    Even then, it is hard to understand the logic of "If he is sending a message from Chicago .... then it should have been sent from Australia."

    It would be better as "If he is sending China a message, then he should send it from Australia, not Chicago."

    Cross-posted with S1m0n. with whom I agree.
    Thank you so much, srk.

    I don't think "which" works in that spot by itself but I agree that there are serious logical/grammatical problems with the sentence. I think a few more changes are needed.

    "If he was sending China a message from Chicago then that was a message perhaps, if it was going to be advanced*, which would have been better sent from Australia so there was no confusion that the Prime Minister was advancing Australia's national interest," he said.

    * his comments presume it was advanced and it's not really a case of "if"
    Thank you so much, kentix.
     
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