advantage to vs. advantage of

pistakee

Senior Member
English, United States
There are many advantages to studying....
One advantage of studying is....

Can anyone summarize when to say "advantage of" and when we say "advantage to"?
Thanks.
 
  • Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Generally advantage takes the preposition of [or over]. If the sentence meaning is advantage to do or to be doing something, advantage could take to. Eg. It is an advantage to learn swimming. A knowledge of swimming is not enough.
     
    Last edited:

    Lucky_15

    Member
    Vietnamese
    Hello,
    I have a question please.
    Is it incorrect to say "there are many advantages of living in a big city"?
    Thank you.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello,
    I have a question please.
    Is it incorrect to say "there are many advantages of living in a big city"?
    Thank you.
    Hello, Lucky 15. I'd think your sentence was perfect if you changed one little word: There are many advantages to living in a big city. I'd use "of" in other remarks: One of the advantages of living in a big city is that there is always plenty of entertainment.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I would not say 'advantages to living in a big city' (and I would not say 'the secret to living in a big city is..').
    However, such expressions are used. 'Of' in my opinion is preferable in these cases.

    Also correct: 'There are many advantages in living in a big city'.
     

    wahri

    New Member
    French
    Hi everyone, I up the topic cause I'm not sure to have fully understood the difference that exists between "advantages to being / of being"Could someone come up with a grammar rule or something ? :DThanks
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Welcome to the forum, wahri!

    Based on the guidance in this thread, can you post a sentence in which you think "advantage to" might be correct? That will give us something to work with.
     

    wahri

    New Member
    French
    Thanks Florentia!

    The sentence I've heard was "There are advantages to being vice-president"

    the context is that someone got somebody doing something for him.

    But would it be correct to say "there are advantages of being VP" ?

    Thanks!
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I would say,
    "There are advantages to being vice-president: one is that you have servants."
    or
    "It is an advantage to be vice-president: you have servants."
    but
    "The advantages of being vice-president are that you have servants and the pay is good."
    or
    "An advantage of being vice-president is that you have servants."
     
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