advantage

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  • hotpocket

    Senior Member
    American English / Boston
    There are advantages to not having servants.

    I came across this sentence in a concise English-Chinese dictionary. My question is, what's the difference if I use of instead of to here?


    Many thanks in advance.
    To my American ear, OF sounds completely incorrect in this context...

    There are advantages OF TO not having servants

    I would use OF below...

    One of the advantages OF not having servants would be...

    I WOULD BET MONEY ON THE FACT THAT YOU DON'T ACTUALLY HAVE AN OPTION. "There are advantages OF not having servants" IS JUST PLAIN WRONG.
     
    Last edited:

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I disagree with Professor Murphy. In AE,

    There are advantages to [noun phrase].

    If you wish to describe the longer noun phrase, advantages [preposition] not having servants, then of is most idiomatic.

    One of the advantages of not having servants is that you don't become weak from inactivity.

    There are advantages to noting that each preposition is used in a different setting.

    In my variant of English, you cannot say,
    There are advantages of noting that each preposition is used in a different setting.

    It sounds wrong.
     

    Alxmrphi

    Senior Member
    UK English
    My liege, forgive my parlance of a different tongue, direct me to the gallows. :p

    Just kidding, I didn't realise how it sounded in AE.

    In my variant of English, you cannot say,
    There are advantages of noting that each preposition is used in a different setting.
    I agree, but if you say "There will be..." then 'of' sounds correct to me, but I think I've been thinking about this too much and my judgment is all muddy, I don't think 'to' sounds right with 'will be', ugh I'm not sure about anything anymore.
     
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