adventure as a verb

Hi, I need to know if the word ADVENTURE can be used comfortably as a verb, I guess this usage is rare, but I want to listen to native opinions. it seems to mean "to embark on an adventure" or "to make a foray."

Some google examples:

Rocky knew he couldn't continue racing with his injuries so he adventured into Ballooning.
They are also passionate about adventuring into foreign lands to conquer new frontiers.
Dorothy is adventuring in the magical land with her friends.
We adventured into the park by canoe, hiking, and elephant rides.

Thanks in advance
 
  • Rocky knew he couldn't continue racing with his injuries so he adventured into ballooning.
    They are also passionate about adventuring into foreign lands to conquer new frontiers.
    Dorothy is adventuring in the magical land with her friends.
    We adventured into the park by canoe, hiking, and elephant rides.

    I would always use venture in the first three of the above.

    The fourth sentence sounds quite wrong altogether.

    Rover
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, it is rare and can sound outdated. The old-fashioned sense (appropriate for fairy tales, including Dorothy's adventures) is "go on an adventure". This is metaphorically used in the first sentence: adventuring into ballooning is trying out ballooning as a new adventure.

    The fourth sentence is probably using it to mean "go on an adventure holiday". I don't know whether I've seen this before, but it makes sense. We adventured over to Machu Picchu; We adventured through the Rockies.

    There is also a completely outdated sense "venture, hesitantly do", which you might still find in a nineteenth-century novel: She adventured to suggest that they might retire to the drawing-room.
     
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