Adverb place depending on akk. And dativ

h3dh3nter

New Member
persian
Hi everyone;
Recently i came across the adverbs in which i want to learn their position, i know the main structure of using adverbs.
Even there is a key word 'tekmol'. Beside that i want to know the place to adverbs when we have a verb that needs both Dat. And Akk.
Thereby please tell me all its forms(both noun, one of them preposition, both preposition) or at least give me a hit by introducing a webpage about that

Thank you all
 
  • Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi h3dh3nter, "tekmol" is not a German word. Did you really mean this?

    Do you have another example?
    In which context do you want to use it?

    PS: Here I found a source. Adjektive (Adverbien) mit Präposition

    Here I found following:
    Einige Adjektive haben zwei Präpositionen, die zusammen in einem Satz vorkommen können.

    Beispiel: einig +mit +über
    Ich bin mit meinem Geschäftspartner über den Preis einig.


    The verb and the adverb are building a bracket.
     
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    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    The question was very abstract.
    So there are lots of possibilities.
    It depends on what you want to emphasize and on time forms.
    But:
    The adverb is mostly at the end or in the beginning.
    In my example I gave a kind of default.

    Einig bin ich mit meinem Großvater über den Preis.

    This is possible if you want to emphasize "einig".

    Wir sind uns über den Preis einig gewesen. Time forms may supersede the rule adverb at the end by default.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    In my example I gave a kind of default.
    It seems to me that in your example there are no adverbs:
    Ich bin mit meinem Geschäftspartner über den Preis einig: 'einig' is an adjective in predicative position.
    Einig bin ich mit meinem G. über den Preis: alternative adjective/predicate position (emphasis of predicate).
    Ich bin mit meinem Geschäftspartner über den Preis immer einig : here immer is an adverb.
    Immer bin ich mit meinem G. über den Preis einig: alternative adverb position (emphasis of adverb).

    You wrote yourself: ''einige Adjektive haben zwei Präpositionen….
     
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    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    The problem: "adverb" has several definitions, and it is different between English "adverb" and German "Adverb", too.
    duden.de/rechtschreibung/Adverb

    [unflektierbares] Wort, das ein im Satz genanntes Verb, ein Substantiv, ein Adjektiv oder ein anderes Adverb seinem Umstand nach näher bestimmt; Umstandswort (z. B. abends, drüben, fatalerweise)
    English:
    The adverbs in English Grammar - Summary
    Adjectives tell us something about a person or a thing. Adjectives can modify nouns (here: girl) or pronouns (here: she).

    Adverbs tell us in what way someone does something. Adverbs can modify verbs (here: drive), adjectives or other adverbs.


    "Einig" in sie sind sich einig does modify the verb (short: einig sein). So in English it would be an adverb. In German it is an adjective - which I did not see, because I did not find the declination first, like "die einigen Leute" (not very idiomatic, only usable in certain context).
    ---
    The Adjektiv(German definition) "einig" has here the position and function of an adverb (English definition).
    ---

    In German the difference to English is flexion. If flexion is possible it is an Adjektiv according to this definition.
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Since we are talking about German examples, the English definition of 'adverb' has no relevance, I believe. In German, 'einig' is an adjective, as Hutchi admitted. Now the original question seems to concern the position of adverbs inside German sentences - although I would say that the question is expressed in a somewhat confusing way.
    Sorry, I don't agree that in the phrase ''Ich bin...einig'' the word 'einig' has the function of an adverb. For me, adjectives that come after the verb 'sein' can be predicative adjectives only, both in English and German.
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    For me, adjectives that come after the verb 'sein' can be predicative adjectives only, both in English and German.
    Just some thoughts.
    Basically I agree, but ultimately what is the difference between "einig" (adj.) and "in Übereinstimmung"? E.g.: Ich bin in Übereinstimmung … & Ich bin einig...
    Both are predicative complements. "einig" does not function as an adjective, as it does not modify a noun, and has the same function as "in Übereinstimmung", which an adverbial expression.
    (I remember that in older threads it had been discussed whether a word was an adjective or an adverb. Even in Greek, where I thought that the situation was very clear, in a recent thread people were wondering if some words were adjectives or adverbs).
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    Greek
    If that were the criterion, then most qualifiers (qualifying adjectives) would be adverbs: Ich bin gesund = ich bin bei guter Gesundheit…
    Is gesund an adverb?
    I believe it's an adjective, as far as its word class is concerned, but syntactically it's a predicative complement.
    In "Ich bin ein gesunder Mann", "gesunder" would function also syntactically as an adjective, as a qualifier of "Mann".
     
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    bearded

    Senior Member
    Italian
    "Ich bin ein gesunder Mann", "gesunder" would function also syntactically as an adjective, as a qualifier of "Mann".
    We have different concepts as concerns adjectives. In my grammar, they can be either in attributive position (a good man) or in predicative position (the man is good), and in neither position they have an adverbial nature. Many adjectives in predicative position can of course be semantically replaced by an adverbial expression (the man is...of good quality), but they remain adjectives all the same. The definition ''predicative complement'' corresponds to something different (maybe it's just a terminology issue: I'll send you a private message if you are interested, as I feel we are already a bit ''off topic''). It seems that you regard only attributes as 'adjectives'.... is that so?
     
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