adverb + verb

mamabird

New Member
US, ENGLISH
Hi,

A friend's son wants to write "I chose global warming because it is terribly killing animals." I think he means "it is terrible killing animals" and was thinking that I could say you can't put an adverb in front of a verb, but then remembered that you can ("needlessly killing animals", for instance). Is there a rule I can cite (other than it sounds bad) to correct him?

Thanks for your help.
 
  • Strat698

    Member
    English-USA
    I believe his sentence is techically correct, but it is not a common usage. His English teacher might be able to explain why to him.
     

    foraster

    New Member
    British English
    Terrible, in this sentence, is an adjective which is describing it ( which is the action of killing animals ) - it is terrible ....... What is terrible? Killing animals is terrible.
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I believe his sentence is techically correct, but it is not a common usage. His English teacher might be able to explain why to him.
    Yeah, something like that. "Terribly" usually has the sense of "badly" in English, as in "She sings terribly."
    I have a hard time reading the sentence as anything other than "I chose global warming because it is not killing animals very well."

    There are more fitting adverbs, such as "tragically."
     
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