advertised by XXX on TV / advertised on TV by XXX

Resa Reader

Senior Member
On a German forum I've just answered a question about putting a sentence into passive voice.

The sentence in active voice was: "Holiday companies are now advertising eco-holidays on TV."

Passive voice:

a) Eco-holidays are now being presented by holiday companies on TV.

b) Eco-holidays are now being presented on TV by holiday companies. [the poster's solution]

Some argue that only the word order in sentence a) is possible. I'd say that both sentences are possible.

What do say?

 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Why does the verb change from "advertise" to "present"?

    The sentence order in B is better and more easily understandable. The sentence order in A is possible, but not as fluid (because it looks like "holiday companies on TV" may be a unit).
     

    Resa Reader

    Senior Member
    Why does the verb change from "advertise" to "present"?

    The sentence order in B is better and more easily understandable. The sentence order in A is possible, but not as fluid (because it looks like "holiday companies on TV" may be a unit).
    Thanks for your answer.

    (It was not my intention to change the verb. It just somehow happended. :))
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The first one is correct grammatically but is what some call a "garden path sentence" because "presented" has two meanings. "Presented on TV" - shown on television. "Presented" just means "given."
    Eco-holidays are now being presented by holiday companies (Wow! They are giving away holidays! I wonder if they will present one to me!) on TV (Wait, does "on TV' go with "presenting"? I'll have to read the sentence again. Yes, it does. Oh, darn! They're just showing the holidays on TV. :mad:) You might even wonder if they are being presented by "holiday-companies-on-TV". ;)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Unlike in German where the order “Subject, verb, time, manner, place” is followed somewhat strictly, English does not usually have that strictness but where it does primarily chooses Subject, verb, place, manner, time.

    German: I went yesterday by train to London
    English: I went to London by train yesterday

    However, to emphasise the time element, English may use:

    Time, subject, verb, place, manner:

    Yesterday, I went to London by train.

    And, to emphasise the manner element, English may use:

    Time, subject, verb, manner, place:

    "[I usually drive but] yesterday I went by train to London.
     
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