advertised for their projects

marylou2010

Senior Member
German (Swiss)
<< Topic 'advertise for'. >>

Dear all,

"The pupils advertised for their projects." Does that mean that they communicatiated with their fellow students and the info about their projects spread...?

Thank you everyone!
 
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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Hello marylou. :)

    Thank you for searching for a previous thread. I thought that your question was different enough to deserve its own thread, and have split it off.

    If I have misunderstood your question, please explain it again.

    Thank you.
    :)
     
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    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    'To advertise for [something]' means 'to put out advertisements asking for [something]'.

    For example: 'The manager advertised for an assitant'.
    This means that the manager put advertisements in newspapers or online inviting people to apply for the job of assistant.
     

    marylou2010

    Senior Member
    German (Swiss)
    Thanks a lot to all of you! Well, I will try to explain what I mean. The expressione should refer to: The students were working on projects and e.g. by word-of-mouth made their projects more public (more and more of the other students heard about their project ...). Do you understand what I mean? If the verb only works in the context that wandle suggested then I can surely not use it in mine. What do you think?
     

    morior_invictus

    Senior Member
    Slovak
    Hi marylou,
    "to advertize for (something) = to make a public request for (something)," so you cannot use it in your context, as wandle mentioned above.
    My suggestions are:
    "to create make word-of-mouth publicity for something," "to spread the word about something," "to get people talking about something," "to promote something through WOM marketing"... or "to inject something into people`s conversations." :D
    I can`t provide you with more options, because it would be a do-not-make-lists infringement and it`s not allowed. :)

    Apropos, advertising is a paid and non-personal form of communication. ;)
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with morior_invictus and his suggestions, with one minor change.
    We would say "create ... publicity" rather than "make ... publicity".
     

    marylou2010

    Senior Member
    German (Swiss)
    Thanks a lot you two:) Unfortunately, minor-invictus, I did not get your joke about advertising:( Anyways, the rest is perfectly clear:)
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You could use advertise without for.
    Example: 9/13/12 Back to School Night – Service Learning students advertised their services by making over 200 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and donating them to a homeless shelter. In addition, students acted as guides for parents.
    (http://bhhs.bhusd.org/apps/pages/index.jsp?uREC_ID=166449&type=d&pREC_ID=342991)

    To advertise something does not necessarily imply an advertisement. You can advertise skills, services and projects by promoting them or spreading the word about them in some way.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    The expressione should refer to: The students were working on projects and e.g. by word-of-mouth made their projects more public (more and more of the other students heard about their project ...).
    This seems to me to imply that others learned about the projects as an unintended or unplanned result of the students' talking about their work.

    If so, you could say 'Knowledge of the projects spread [among fellow-pupils] by word of mouth'.

    Note: 'spread' here is the past tense of the verb 'to spread' (intransitive).
     
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