Advertised on = which is advertised on

uktous

Senior Member
cantonese
Hi,

Question:
Do the following 3 sentences have the same meaning?

Sentece1:
I would like to apply for a Graduate Trainee position with ABC Ltd which is advertised on Jobsdb.
Sentece2:
I would like to apply for a Graduate Trainee position with ABC Ltd advertised on Jobsdb.
Sentece3:
I would like to apply for a Graduate Trainee position with ABC Ltd on Jobsdb.

My opinion:


I was told that Advertised = which is advertised.
Therefore, sentence1 and 2 hould have the same meaning.

Sentence3's meaning is different from other 2, because it doesn't have the word "advertise". But its meaning is still correct.



Thanks
 
  • andy_westken

    Senior Member
    I think the third one _could_ be taken to mean the same thing. But it relies much more on context and wouldn't be much use in written form (it could also mean, maybe, that you want to use Jobsdb's automated application system to apply for the job?)

    But if you rang up the advertiser and used just the "on" they would probably understand you, especially if you were already talking about other jobs.

    By the way, I think the examples would be better if they talked about "the position" rather than "a position". Advertisements tend to be for specific jobs. As it stands, it sounds like you'll accept any position with ABC Ltd as long as it's advertised on Jobsdb.

    The other variant that turns up is "as advertised on". This one only works with "the", I think.

    "I would like to apply for the Graduate Trainee position with ABC Ltd as advertised on Jobsdb."

    (Though, thinking about it, I would probably only use this last version when writing. If I was speaking to someone about the job, I would make it more personal: "the position that you are advertising...")
     
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