advocate/promote

Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friends,

I was wondering which sentence is more idiomatic:

1) He is the man who advocates the positive lifestyle.

2) He is the man who promotes the positive lifestyle.

Thoughts: He is the man who is in favor of the positive lifestyle and encourages others to lead a positive life.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "1) He is the man who advocates the positive lifestyle." sounds a little strange to me: "the Positive Lifestyle." sounds like a commercial name and would require capital letters. If it is not a commercial name, then "the" is strange, and would be better as "a". He is the man who advocates a positive lifestyle." (Crosspost with londoncalling.)

    Advocate - to speak in support of. Not necessarily commercially or for gain, often in a balanced manner. To advocate is a slightly higher register than promote.

    Promotes - to speak in support of. Often commercially or for gain, often in a unbalanced manner.

    "He is the man who advocates a positive lifestyle." -> this could be said by a doctor who is simply worried that many people are depressed.
    "He is the man who promotes a positive lifestyle." -> this could be said by a person who has just written a book on fighting depression and wants to sell a lot of copies.
     
    Last edited:

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "1) He is the man who advocates the positive lifestyle." sounds a little strange to me: "the Positive Lifestyle." sounds like a commercial name and would require capital letters. If it is not a commercial name, then "the" is strange, and would be better as "a". He is the man who advocates a positive lifestyle." (Crosspost with londoncalling.)

    Advocate - to speak in support of. Not necessarily commercially or for gain, often in a balanced manner. To advocate is a slightly higher register than promote.

    Promotes - to speak in support of. Often commercially or for gain, often in a unbalanced manner.

    "He is the man who advocates a positive lifestyle." -> this could be said by a doctor who is simply worried that many people are depressed.
    "He is the man who promotes a positive lifestyle." -> this could be said by a person who has just written a book on fighting depression and wants to sell a lot of copies.
    Thank you very much. The context is a bit different from your two interpretations:

    I went to Jason Mraz's concert. He is a man who writes positive songs and always shows his positive lifestyle to influence people. In the concert, he also talked about a lot on the positive lifestyle. He said he is not a positive person but he would write the positive song and he believes such songs can shine on your life.

    I was wondering whether advocate is suitable in the context and is there any synonyms I can use?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    sun14 said:
    I went to Jason Mraz's concert. He is a man who writes positive songs and always shows uses his positive lifestyle to influence people. In the concert, he also talked about a lot on the a positive lifestyle. He said he is not a positive person himself but he would write wrote the positive songs and he believes such songs can shine on your life (not idiomatic, you require another phrase).
    It seems Jason Mraz is a man who advocates a positive lifestyle/outlook on life.
     

    reka39

    Banned
    Italian
    Hi!
    I have a question with reference to "advocate for".
    I found this verb in the following sentence on membership-based intermediaries - "At the other side of the continuum are organizations that play an active, direct role in advocating for their members. This may take to form of collective bargaining in a multi-employer relationship, as in the case of unions in the construction industry".
    Thank you.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In this case, and taking into consideration the word "actively" I would suggest it means to support by argument (actively), to argue in favour of somebody.
    I was wondering whether "advocate" is generally used as a noun when collocating with "for"?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I was wondering whether "advocate" is generally used as a noun when collocating with "for"?
    In Sushi's example:
    play an active, direct role in advocating for their members
    'advocating' is a gerund; it is based on the verb form 'advocate'.

     
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