AE/BE Spelling differences.

gaer

Senior Member
US-English
Here are a few words that are spelled differently:

manoeuvre, maneuver
travelled, traveled
colour, color

There are many more. I'm interested in how many words all of you have run across that are spelled (spelt) differently in books, depending on where the books are published. :)

Gaer
 
  • gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Benjy said:
    gauge | gage
    grey | gray
    ye olde | old
    We also write "gauge". You've stumbled across another word, I think:

    gage
    Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wetti pledge -- more at WED
    1 : a token of defiance; specifically : a glove or cap cast on the ground to be taken up by an opponent as a pledge of combat
    2 : something deposited as a pledge of performance

    "Grey" is so common, it's one of the words I had trouble learning to spell correctly—"gray". :)
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    gaer said:
    We also write "gauge". You've stumbled across another word, I think:

    gage
    Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wetti pledge -- more at WED
    1 : a token of defiance; specifically : a glove or cap cast on the ground to be taken up by an opponent as a pledge of combat
    2 : something deposited as a pledge of performance

    "Grey" is so common, it's one of the words I had trouble learning to spell correctly—"gray". :)

    i'm glad you didn't take my ye olde seriously ;) as for gauge, i swear i have seen it written down as gage in us texts. or maybe i just saw it in my oxford wich definiately has gage (us) = guage in it. of course, i trust people over dicos ;) the word gage as what you have i didn't know existed in english.. it's the same in french :)

    edit:
    "what do you do when you have to move from standard gage rail to barges...you could also load preloaded narrow gage cars on standard gage cars and just roll them off at the railhead or onto a barge that will take them to the forward log base."

    now i don't know if this is lazy spelling and not an american standard spelling but it seems to be pretty widespread.
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    marvelled / marveled
    marvelling / marveling
    neighbour / neighbor
    harbour / harbor
    favourite / favorite

    :confused: I think AE is interchangeable in the use of the double l in travel and marvel words. I use the double l.

    Sharon.:)
     

    abc

    Senior Member
    Vietnam, Vietnamese
    This thread reminds me of Mrs. Bouquet (Bucket) in Keeping up Appearances.:)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    A dusty old favorite from my days as an antiquarian bookman:
    gilt (AE) and guilt(BE) meaning covered with gold leaf.

    We used to joke that our British colleagues had volumes that belonged in jail [gaol]:
    AEG (all edges gilt/guilt/guilty)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    American/British

    aluminum/aluminium
    analyze/analyse
    catalog(ue)/catalogue
    center/centre
    check/cheque
    jewelry/jewellery
    program/programme
    tire/tyre
    traveler/traveller
    labor/labour
    meter/meter
    theater/theatre
    defense/defence
    pajamas/pyjamas

    Cheers!! :p :p :p
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Benjy said:
    i'm glad you didn't take my ye olde seriously ;) as for gauge, i swear i have seen it written down as gage in us texts. or maybe i just saw it in my oxford wich definiately has gage (us) = guage in it. of course, i trust people over dicos ;) the word gage as what you have i didn't know existed in english.. it's the same in french :)

    edit:
    "what do you do when you have to move from standard gage rail to barges...you could also load preloaded narrow gage cars on standard gage cars and just roll them off at the railhead or onto a barge that will take them to the forward log base."

    now i don't know if this is lazy spelling and not an american standard spelling but it seems to be pretty widespread.
    Benji,

    "Googling" does not necessarily prove anything, but I think this may give us the answer this time:

    4,680 for "standard gage".
    162,000 for "standard gauge"

    We have to remember how many wrong things are written. This might shock you. I mentioned it somewhere else:

    31,700 for "for my wife and I".
    11,600 for "for my wife and me"

    The WRONG way is almost three times as common. That might explain why we hear some very intelligent people, who in general speak English well, make that mistake. :)
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Sharon said:
    marvelled / marveled
    marvelling / marveling
    neighbour / neighbor
    harbour / harbor
    favourite / favorite

    :confused: I think AE is interchangeable in the use of the double l in travel and marvel words. I use the double l.

    Sharon.:)
    Sharon, I think perhaps you read a great deal of books published in AE and BE style. "Travelling" looks just fine to me, but my spellchecker rejects it. We may be fooled because the American way seems illogical, phonetically!

    others:

    judgement, judgment
    aeroplane, airplane
    aluminium, aluminum
    analogue, analog
    analyse, analyze (and many others like this)
    encyclopaedia, encyclopedia
    aeroplane, airplane
    aluminium, aluminum
    analogue, analog
    analyse, analyze (and many others like this)
    encyclopaedia, encyclopedia
    ardour, ardor
    armour / armor
    behaviour, behavior
    calibre, caliber
    catalogue, catalog
    centimetre, centimeter
    cheque, check
    clamour, clamor
    colour
    defence (AmericanEnglish "defense")
    digitise (AmericanEnglish "digitize")
    endeavour
    enrol / enrolled / enrolment
    epicentre

    I've never understood the American spelling there and stubbornly write the English form, "jugement".

    Just found a great page!

    http://www.peak.org/~jeremy/dictionary/tables/spellcat.php#ph

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    mylam said:
    Cool link gaer! :) Has anybody ever seen "employe" (one final e) used??? :confused:

    Myla
    I don't THINK so, but my spelling is so poor, both British and American spellings look equally right to me most of the time. That's not an exaggeration!
     

    Panpan

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I don't know why British English is so inconsistent when it comes to dropping superfluous 'u's.

    E.g. we use colour, but coloration, honour, but honorific.

    Panpan
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    gaer said:
    Benji,

    "Googling" does not necessarily prove anything, but I think this may give us the answer this time:

    4,680 for "standard gage".
    162,000 for "standard gauge"

    We have to remember how many wrong things are written. This might shock you. I mentioned it somewhere else:

    31,700 for "for my wife and I".
    11,600 for "for my wife and me"

    The WRONG way is almost three times as common. That might explain why we hear some very intelligent people, who in general speak English well, make that mistake. :)


    hehe.. yeah, thats what i meant. thanks for clearing that up. it was esp the dictionary entry that was bothering me. thanks the concise answer :)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    LV4-26 said:
    I think all the BE words ending in -our actually end in -or in AE. (as is obvious in several of the examples given), like harbour / harbor and so on...
    But I may be wrong.
    Your, sour, pour... :D
     

    Sharon

    Senior Member
    United States, English
    gaer said:
    Sharon, I think perhaps you read a great deal of books published in AE and BE style. "Travelling" looks just fine to me, but my spellchecker rejects it. We may be fooled because the American way seems illogical, phonetically.
    Gaer
    Yes, Gaer, I do read a lot of books, in both styles.

    As a child, I read a lot of Roald Dahl, which probably influenced my spellings of some words. I still remember being seven years old, and my teacher marking "colour" wrong on a spelling test! :mad: I took "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" in to show her, (-> I'm a little stubborn! :D) and she dismissed it with, "Well, but that's the English spelling," which bothered me to no end, as I was of the opinion that we were learning English!! :rolleyes:

    I no longer trust my spellchecker! It wouldn't accept the word "lieu" and insists that I must use "saber-toothed" in lieu of "sabre-toothed." :thumbsdown:

    Sharon.:)
     

    mylam

    Senior Member
    United States English
    Crystal84 said:
    seen / scene
    air / heir
    and i'm pretty sure that there are many that no one has discovered yet.


    Sorry, Crystal, but your example are homophones (words that sound the same, but have different meanings), not differences between AE and BE spellings. :)

    Myla
     

    abc

    Senior Member
    Vietnam, Vietnamese
    mylam said:
    Has anybody ever seen "employe" (one final e) used??? :confused:

    Myla

    Yes, I have seen it several times. The first time that I saw it I nearly fainted. Nah, I was just kidding, but the form really threw me off balance. I had to go home and looked it up in the dictionary to be certain that the form employe did exist. Sometimes I wonder why the feminine forms of many French words, especially the adjectives that end in -ive were retained instead of the masculine form that ends in -if.

    Who,

    No, I've not seen employé used like the way employee and employe are being used. I don't think diacritics are that popular in the English language.

    Gaer,

    I agree that judgement looks better than judgment, but phonetically speaking, there are only two syllables in the word. The dropping of the e couldn't be very irrational then, right? Having said that, I still constantly use judgement.

    P.S. Thanks for the links! Great sites!
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    gaer said:
    I've never seen "employé" used in English though!
    No, becuase that word would be pronounced with a long "a" at the end because of the accent (employé = em-ploy-ay; passé = pa-say).
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    abc said:
    Who,

    No, I've not seen employé used like the way employee and employe are being used. I don't think diacritics are that popular in the English language.

    And if so, what about "fiancé(e)", "passé(e)", "née (AE: nee)", "manœuvre (AE: maneuver)" ?

    All of them have diacritics and I think they're popular, ain't 'em?
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Thanks. These are good lists...but don't believe everything you read. Some of the list of BE words not used in AE are used here: banger, toad in the hole, and a couple of others. But for the most part, it's accurate.

    C.

    Nick said:
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    And if so, what about "fiancé(e)", "passé(e)", "née (AE: nee)", "manœuvre (AE: maneuver)" ?

    All of them have diacritics and I think they're popular, ain't 'em?
    I've seen all the words you mentioned EXCEPT for "employé". :)

    Gaer
     

    Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    i have to admit that i have always seen employee written with the double e never à la française. unless of course the language was actually french in which case... blah blah blah.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Benjy said:
    i have to admit that i have always seen employee written with the double e never à la française. unless of course the language was actually french in which case... blah blah blah.
    Exactly. Strangely, English seems to be consistent about keeping letters but not accents, and if you know a word in another language, it really seems strange.

    I'm sure you've seen doppelganger, and that's simply wrong. It's doppelgänger, and the wrong spelling causes the word to be mispronounced. :)
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    gaer said:
    Exactly. Strangely, English seems to be consistent about keeping letters but not accents, and if you know a word in another language, it really seems strange.

    I'm sure you've seen doppelganger, and that's simply wrong. It's doppelgänger, and the wrong spelling causes the word to be mispronounced. :)

    Good example. But it's the same with the capitalization of German-English words. It looks wrong to see 'lederhose' with a small letter, but it looks fine to an English eye. In German, we usually keep the French accents, like Déjà vu and à la française (benjy, why not au français?) but we mostly capitalize them. Funny thing ... :eek:
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In German, we usually keep the French accents, like Déjà vu and à la française (benjy, why not au français?) but we mostly capitalize them. Funny thing ...
    It’s short for “à la manière française”, I think.

    One more a question of accents: Do you really use 'ampère'? I found it in my dictionary, but even we Germans who keep the accents don't use it with.
    The unit’s name is based on the name of a French gentleman called André Marie Ampère. I don't think you miss much if you leave out the accent mark, though. :)
     

    MadTomVane

    Member
    USA English
    What an interesting thread. A few years ago I tried to document all these differences. What some people seem to miss is that there are exceptions. For instance "glamour" still has its "u" even in the USA. And some American spellings coexist with their British versions rather than replacing them. For example: theater/theatre, ax/axe, gray/grey, archeology/archaeology. I've seen both versions used in US-printed books.

    Here's something interesting. One thing I found out back when I was researching this stuff is that the American variants didn't appear at the same time. It started in the early 1800s with our/or: in the Declaration of Independence (1776) you can find "honour," and in the Constitution (1787) "behaviour," but most books published after 1830 use "or" rather than "our." But the re/er change didn't happen until later. Read a book published in the mid-1800s, like "The Scarlet Letter" (1850) and you will find "centre" and "fibre" right along side "color" and "neighbor." At the US Navy Historical website you can find the 1864 Uniform Regulations, which still used the word "centre."

    And it seems the South didn't follow the new standards. At the time of the Civil War (or "War of Northern Aggression") Southerners still wrote "colour" and "honour," and other apparent Britishisms like "to-day" and not putting a period after titles like "Mr." My sources for this were some documents I read for a US History class, and a book of Virginia State Legislature records from 1861 I found lying in a college library. There is today (to-day?) an organization called The Southern League, dedicated to the members' Southern heritage, and they make it a point to use British orthography, as this was how it was done before the war.

    At some website (I forget where) I found some old maps of various states at various points in the 1870s. By looking at how "Centerville"/"Centreville" (there are several US towns with that name) was spelled, I figure that the re/er change happened around the mid-1870s.

    In one class I had to read a short story called "The Yellow Wallpaper," written around 1895 or so. In that one I found "center" but the story referred to a gust of wind as a "draught" (today that would be "draft").

    The reason for the or/our change was Noah Webster's dictionary, first published sometime in the 1820s. I don't know about what caused the other changes, though.

    That's about all I know. I hope someone found this useful. I've been waiting for almost 4 years for an excuse to write all this somewhere.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    cuchuflete said:
    Thanks. These are good lists...but don't believe everything you read. Some of the list of BE words not used in AE are used here: banger, toad in the hole, and a couple of others. But for the most part, it's accurate.

    C.
    Cuchu, I meant to mention this the other night: "banger", "toad in the hole", what do these mean? Have you thought about the fact that "New England" may be more accurate than you think? :)

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    Good example. But it's the same with the capitalization of German-English words. It looks wrong to see 'lederhose' with a small letter, but it looks fine to an English eye. In German, we usually keep the French accents, like Déjà vu and à la française (benjy, why not au français?) but we mostly capitalize them. Funny thing ... :eek:
    Who, as you well know, I'm bothered by the lack of capital letters when using German nouns, but I follow the custom in English. If I'm not careful, I WILL type: Doppelgänger. It's also hard for me to prounounce American names in the American way when they appear to be German, for example, "Spielberg". :)

    As for accents, it is not standardized. Sometimes French words have them, other times not. I haven't figured out why. Probably because most of us don't uderstand what the accents in French do, so we are going to prounce things the same, with or without them. Same may be true with Doppelgänger. Think of our word "gang". But I would prefer to see the proper accents when available!

    Gaer
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    gaer said:
    Who, as you well know, I'm bothered by the lack of capital letters when using German nouns, but I follow the custom in English. If I'm not careful, I WILL type: Doppelgänger. It's also hard for me to prounounce American names in the American way when they appear to be German, for example, "Spielberg". :)

    As for accents, it is not standardized. Sometimes French words have them, other times not. I haven't figured out why. Probably because most of us don't uderstand what the accents in French do, so we are going to prounce things the same, with or without them. Same may be true with Doppelgänger. Think of our word "gang". But I would prefer to see the proper accents when available!

    Gaer

    Hum, I know why and where to put accents in French, because of its pronunciation. We can't talk about this in writing, only orally.

    The name "Steven Spielberg" is easy because I know the forename is pronounced in English and so the surname too. But I had to read Spielberg without the context, I would try to read it in German.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    from a not very politcally correct website:

    Note: If you are humorless or easily offended, or both,

    do NOT read this post.




    If you choose to read it, and are then tempted to complain, please direct those complaints, in perfect English, to http://www.tealdragon.net/humor/compares/cultures.htm

    thanks,
    Cuchuflete






    Americans: Spell words differently, but still call it "English."
    Brits: Pronounce their words differently, but still call it "English."
    Canadians: Spell like the Brits; pronounce worse than the Americans.
    Aussies: Add "G'day", "mate" and a heavy accent to everything they say in an attempt to get laid.

    Brits: Shop at home and have goods imported because they live on an island.
    Aussies: Shop at home and have goods imported because they live on an island.
    Americans: Cross their southern border for cheap shopping, gas, liquor and cigarettes in a backwards country.
    Canadians: Cross their southern border for cheap shopping, gas, liquor and cigarettes in a backwards country.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    cuchuflete said:
    from a not very politcally correct website:

    Note: If you are humorless or easily offended, or both,

    do NOT read this post.




    If you choose to read it, and are then tempted to complain, please direct those complaints, in perfect English, to http://www.tealdragon.net/humor/compares/cultures.htm

    thanks,
    Cuchuflete






    Americans: Spell words differently, but still call it "English."
    Brits: Pronounce their words differently, but still call it "English."
    Canadians: Spell like the Brits; pronounce worse than the Americans.
    Aussies: Add "G'day", "mate" and a heavy accent to everything they say in an attempt to get laid.

    Brits: Shop at home and have goods imported because they live on an island.
    Aussies: Shop at home and have goods imported because they live on an island.
    Americans: Cross their southern border for cheap shopping, gas, liquor and cigarettes in a backwards country.
    Canadians: Cross their southern border for cheap shopping, gas, liquor and cigarettes in a backwards country.

    That's about as politically INCORRECT as you can get. But personally I think it's very funny too. :)

    Gaer
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    whodunit said:
    Hum, I know why and where to put accents in French, because of its pronunciation. We can't talk about this in writing, only orally.

    The name "Steven Spielberg" is easy because I know the forename is pronounced in English and so the surname too. But I had to read Spielberg without the context, I would try to read it in German.
    The pronunciation of French is something I still do not understand at all, so I would like to learn French words with correct spelling in case I ever figure out the pronuncation!

    There is a guy where I work with the name "Stefan". His mother was born in America but married a German and lived in Germany for many years. As you might imagine, it's hard for me not to pronounce his name in the German manner. :)

    Gaer
     

    mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    I would imagine some French-speaking people don't put accent marks on stuff for the same reasons Spanish people don't put accent marks on stuff. You have to write it in WORD, copy and paste it into the reply box in order for it to transfer on a posting. When in Argentina, there were high school students who decided that accent marks were not that important (unless you want someone to be clear about what you're saying!)

    AE = Ampere
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    mjscott said:
    I would imagine some French-speaking people don't put accent marks on stuff for the same reasons Spanish people don't put accent marks on stuff. You have to write it in WORD, copy and paste it into the reply box in order for it to transfer on a posting. When in Argentina, there were high school students who decided that accent marks were not that important (unless you want someone to be clear about what you're saying!)

    AE = Ampere
    I think you're 100% right! As I mentioned in the German forum, Word comes with a spellchecker for Spanish and French, but none for German. You can get one, but it costs money.

    So it's ironic that I have something to correct my spelling in two languages I don't dare WRITE in. :)

    Gaer
     
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