AE: Rancher

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ayed

Senior Member
Arabic(Saudi)
Hello, folks.

"Most Texas herds tend to be somewhat larger, probably due to selective breeding for the meat market. In fact, some ranchers have renamed them Tennessee Meat Goats."

My question is this:
Are ranchers"livestock traders"or just farmers who construct barbed-wire cattle pens and keep their flocks in"?

My regards

Ayed
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Ranchers raise livestock; farmers raise crops -- and may keep a few chickens and cows around for meat and milk for their own use.
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Confirming and adding to Copyright's reply: Ranchers are not necessarily livestock traders.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Ranchers raise livestock; farmers raise crops -- and may keep a few chickens and cows around for meat and milk for their own use.
    This is not entirely accurate. There is livestock farming as well. Ranching is raising livestock in a certain way, namely keeping it in wide open rangeland rather than in small enclosed pastures or farms.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I was wondering when someone would get to that. In the U.S., a rancher usually has quite a bit of land. The typical ranch in Texas will span several hundred acres and many of them cover thousands of acres.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Ranchers are not necessarily livestock traders.
    Asking very cautiously, just to make sure I understand....
    A "livestock trader" would buy/sell live animals - someone who sold animal meat, but not live animals, would not be a "livestock trader".
    Have I got that right?
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    To me, a livestock trader is someone who buys and sells livestock for a living. While ranchers may sometimes buy livestock it is only for the purposes of improving their herd, as far as I know, and they sell the livestock for meat in order to earn a living. They are not normally "livestock brokers", if that makes any sense as a term.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank you, James.

    I don't think I've quite understood yet, but I'll do some googling: I don't want to sidetrack the thread any further....:eek:
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I don't think it's off-topic because the original poster wanted to know if a rancher was a livestock trader. As far as I know (and please feel free to correct me, anyone), a livestock trader makes money from buying livestock and then selling that livestock at a profit. He doesn't raise the livestock. He treats them as a commodity. He is the "middle man".

    There is another meaning to "livestock trading" these days where people actually buy futures in beef, for example, on a commodity-style market exchange but I don't think that's what the original poster had in mind.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    A ranch is typically extremely large and your cattle can range all over it. It's not really what you would think of as a "farm." Incidentally, in my native Californian dialect, there really are no farms. Everything is a ranch. My grandfather had a sugar beet ranch for instance. This is definitely a regionalism though, and probably one which is dropping out of use as Californians get more and more urbanized and more and more New Yorkers move in.
     

    mathman

    Senior Member
    English-American/New England
    A ranch is typically extremely large and your cattle can range all over it. It's not really what you would think of as a "farm." Incidentally, in my native Californian dialect, there really are no farms. Everything is a ranch. My grandfather had a sugar beet ranch for instance. This is definitely a regionalism though, and probably one which is dropping out of use as Californians get more and more urbanized and more and more New Yorkers move in.
    And in Massachusetts, nobody has a "ranch." There is a pig farm (occupied by a pig farmer and, of course, pigs) in our town, as well as several chicken farms. We also have several dairy farms (which don't have any "dairy" on the premises), and in the western part of the state there is a buffalo farm (as stated on a sign at its entrance).

    I tend to think of "ranch" and "rancher" as terms used west of the Mississippi.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    OF course the word "farm" is known in California,, particularly in official parlance. My grandfather, the sugar beet rancher, was a "farm" adviser. But in the regional dialect, farms and orchards are or were generally referred to as ranches.
     

    WyomingSue

    Senior Member
    English--USA
    Originally posted by Ayed:
    farmers who construct barbed-wire cattle pens and keep their flocks in
    I certainly had to add my bit from Wyoming ... ranchers do use barbed wire, but any given pasture area might be several hundred acres, so the cattle are not normally in "pens". A Wyoming ranch is usually 5000-15000 acres (Texas ranches are even bigger)--typical rangeland for cattle: http://www.tecomatehuntingland.com/images/126575424374706.jpg
    By the way, cattle come in herds; sheep and goats come in flocks.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    A ranch is typically extremely large and your cattle can range all over it. It's not really what you would think of as a "farm." Incidentally, in my native Californian dialect, there really are no farms. Everything is a ranch. My grandfather had a sugar beet ranch for instance. This is definitely a regionalism though, and probably one which is dropping out of use as Californians get more and more urbanized and more and more New Yorkers move in.
    This may well relate to the early history of the territory/state. From this site comes :

    During the Spanish colonization of California, three main types of land claims were made by the Spanish crown: missions (for religious use), presidios (for military use), and pueblos (for civilian use). Land outside of these jurisdictions was granted to individuals by the Spanish and eventually, Mexican governments. These individual land grants were known as ranchos in California.
    Anything that wasn't military, religious or urban/pueblo/village was a rancho. So cows, pigs, nuts, rice, sugar beet etc. would all be grown on a what was a ranch(o).
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    Right, the word "Farm" is the standard word in California, particularly in official parlance. I would be startled to see something called the "Ranch Bureau Federation" or to have someone with the title of "Ranch Advisor." But actual farms are or were primarily called "ranches" no matter what they are growing or raising. I'm sure it comes from the Spanish era.

    Here's the Wolfe Ranch, farming apricots
    http://www.peterwolfe.com/
    and the VaN Dyke Ranch, farming apricots, cherries and veggies
    http://www.vivatierra.com/usa2/van-dyke-ranch-california.html
     
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