affect in a bad way

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esperansa

Senior Member
Russian
Hi.

Alcohol affects your liver in a bad way.

It seems to me that the phrase "affect in a bad way" is not something that a native speaker of English would say. If so, could you suggest something else instead of this phrase?
 
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    Just so you know, esperansa, "in a bad way" is idiomatic. But particularly when being used to mean "has an adverse effect," it's a rather casual expression, too casual for this context, at least in my opinion.
     

    esperansa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Just so you know, esperansa, "in a bad way" is idiomatic. But particularly when being used to mean "has an adverse effect," it's a rather casual expression, too casual for this context, at least in my opinion.
    Hi Kate. Thanks for the reply.
    I am a non-native speaker of English. So I think I don't quite understand your point.
    Does the casual expression mean the rare expression when used in this context about an adverse effect? Is it bad or good when such an expression is casual in this context?
     
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    JustKate

    Senior Member
    Hi Kate. Thanks for the reply.
    I am a non-native speaker of English. So I think I don't quite understand your point.
    Does the casual expression mean the rare expression when used in this context about an adverse effect? Is it bad or good when such an expression is casual in this context?
    I would not recommend using this expression in this context. It's too casual.
     

    esperansa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would not recommend using this expression in this context. It's too casual.
    :(:(:(:(:(

    I found the word "casual" in the Oxford dictionary.
    1. Not regular or permanent, in particular

    Does "casual" mean "uncommon" (not in common use) in this context?
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    :(:(:(:(:(

    I found the word "casual" in the Oxford dictionary.
    1. Not regular or permanent, in particular

    Does "casual" mean uncommon (not in common use) in this context?
    I'm sorry to have been unclear. By casual, I mean "informal" or "not serious." It's not quite slang, but it's rather light and jokey in tone. It's the sort of expression used in conversation with a friend; I wouldn't recommend doing so when writing or speaking about something as serious as liver damage.
     
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    esperansa

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I'm sorry to have been unclear. By casual, I mean "informal" or "not serious." It's not quite slang, but it's rather light and jokey in tone. It's the sort of expression used in conversation with a friend, I wouldn't recommend doing so when writing or speaking about something as serious as liver damage.
    Thank you. Clear.
     
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