affective, affectional and affectionate

Annielove123

New Member
Chinese
Hello everyone,

I am working on my vocabulary.

There are three adjectives which are all stemed from affect. I have looked up in several dictionaries, but still not quite understand the differences among them.

Can you help me with this? Thank you in advance.
 
  • Annielove123

    New Member
    Chinese
    Hi, perpend.

    Thanks for your kind reply. I am sorry for not giving you the related information regarding the question. Here are three sentences that I found.

    1. affective disorders (from Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary)
    2. He is very affectionate towards his children. (from Oxford Dictionary)
    3. Carrie realised the change of affectional atmosphere at once. (from Sister Carrie)

    Thanks a lot. :)

    Annie
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    There are three adjectives which are all stemed from affect. I have looked up in several dictionaries, but still not quite understand the differences among them.
    Can you help me with this? Thank you in advance.
    Hi again Annie, I would use "affective".

    EDIT: Where did you get the sentences (the links are there), meaning ... what do you want to say?
     
    Last edited:

    Annielove123

    New Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much. What I want to know is that:

    1. Are there any remarkable differences among the three words? To me, it seems that the three wrods can be freely replaced by each other.

    2. Which word do you mostly use when you want to say somebody is easily affected by something?

    3. I am sorry but I am not allowed to post links for now, so...
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Hi again, Annie. I reread this, since sometimes it's good to sleep on things. :)

    Do you possibly mean that the person becomes emotional? I could see another angle.
     

    Annielove123

    New Member
    Chinese
    Hi Perpend, thanks very much for following up. Then, I can use emotional, right?

    Sorry for the delay in replying you. I was on a tour in China, you know, meeting people and finding beautiful places.

    Wish you a great new year~~

    Annie
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    1. Are there any remarkable differences among the three words? To me, it seems that the three wrods can be freely replaced by each other.

    2. Which word do you mostly use when you want to say somebody is easily affected by something?
    I agree with perpend: none of the adjectives you mention describe someone who is easily affected by something.

    As to the adjectives, the one I'm most familiar with is affectionate, which means 'tending to show affection', as in Kittens are very affectionate and cuddly because to survive they have to remain close to their mothers.

    Affective I have not come across, but it seems, by its AHD entry, to be a term used in the scientific field of psychology. I would venture to guess that it's not part of the average English-speaking person's active vocabulary.

    Affectional I would understand in context, but not by itself. I see it as the adjectival form of the noun affection, like emotional would be the adjectival form of the noun emotion. Both affection and emotion have more than one meaning, thus both affectional and emotional also have more than one meaning. If you know the meanings of the nouns, you can figure out the meanings of the adjectives.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    1. Affective disorders (from Oxford Advanced Learners' Dictionary) - relating to an external expression of emotion associated with an idea or action
    2. He is very affectionate towards his children. (from Oxford Dictionary) – loving; feeling or showing affection
    3. Carrie realised the change of affectional atmosphere at once. (from Sister Carrie) - Of or relating to the affections; having affections, emotional.
     
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