Affinity

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dalvaran

New Member
Philippines - Tagalog & English
Is it right to say that a molecule has a "higher binding affinity" with another molecule, or is "higher affinity" enough?

E.g. Carbon monoxide has a higher binding affinity(?) to haemoglobin compared to oxygen.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It appears there's a difference: affinity, or chemical affinity, is an attraction between atoms or molecules generally, in any kind of chemistry, while binding affinity is specific to biochemistry, such as between drugs and their receptors. So I'm not sure which side your example belongs on.
     

    dalvaran

    New Member
    Philippines - Tagalog & English
    It appears there's a difference: affinity, or chemical affinity, is an attraction between atoms or molecules generally, in any kind of chemistry, while binding affinity is specific to biochemistry, such as between drugs and their receptors. So I'm not sure which side your example belongs on.
    I am interested in how it is used in the context of biochemistry. Didn't think there would be a difference on its use between chemistry and biochemistry. Sorry for the confusion!
     
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