afford on/with my salary

  • sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Because I'm a non-native speaker. I can introduce whatever I might find possible:D.
    No, a translation from Russian is rather "afford it on my salary".

    Thank you!
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    OK, but at post 3, you say "If I could [use 'with'], why could you not?" That's like saying "If a non-native speaker does it this way, why don't the native speakers?" : :confused::confused: Of all the prepositions that you could have chosen, why did you choose "with"? Why do you say you could use "afford it with my salary" when that expression is not attested?
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    OK, but at post 3, you say "If I could [use 'with'], why could you not?" That's like saying "If a non-native speaker does it this way, why don't the native speakers?" : :confused::confused:
    No, I said: "if I could, why would you not?" (because you'd said "I suppose you could, but I don't think I would"). I meant -- if a native speaker wouldn't use it by himself, why does he say that a non-native speaker could use it?:)
    Of all the prepositions that you could have chosen, why did you choose "with"? Why do you say you could use "afford it with my salary" when that expression is not attested?
    I didn't know it was not attested. I just found it logical, as I said in #4, and I found some examples in Google:)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    OK. I was trying to be generous, so I didn't say "No, you can't use 'I can't afford something with my salary'"; I said "I suppose you could but I don't think I would". If you found some examples on Google, I can see the reason for your question - but it would have helped if you had said at post 1 precisely where you found these examples.

    I'm off.
     
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