afford somebody to do something

Yichen

Senior Member
Chinese
hello everyone,

Are the following correct?

1. This opportunity has afforded him to see his half sister. He has a half brother there as well, whom he has never met. ...

2. Kellogg was a talented and adventurous person with a zeal for life which afforded him to become an accomplished Flamenco guitarist.

3. His wealth thus afforded him to partake of the cultural and intellectual legacy of all the best parts of the empire.

I have consulted my dictionary, but there is no "afford somebody to do" structure.



Thanks.
 
  • Sharifa345

    Senior Member
    USA
    US English, DR Spanish
    "afford" as a transitive verb is the same as "to allow/permit/ make possible."
    I'm pretty sure it's always followed by a noun, so I would make the following changes:

    1. This opportunity has afforded him the opportunity to see his half sister. He has a half brother there as well, whom he has never met. ...

    2. Kellogg was a talented and adventurous person with a zeal for life which that afforded him the opportunity/chance to become an accomplished Flamenco guitarist.

    3. His wealth thus afforded him the chance to partake of the cultural and intellectual legacy of all the best parts of the empire.
     

    Lauriso

    New Member
    Latvian
    Hi there!

    I know this is an old thread, but still:

    How about a sentence like this: Just being my neighbour didn't afford her (the right to?) such liberties."
     

    apmahd

    New Member
    English - Canada
    How about a sentence like this: Just being my neighbour didn't afford her (the right to?) such liberties."
    This is perfectly correct. Omit the portion in parentheses; "the right to such liberties" comes across as redundant.
     

    apmahd

    New Member
    English - Canada
    Actually, thinking about it again, depending on what exactly you mean by "liberties", "the right to take such liberties" might be a better translation. In its most basic sense, "liberties" and "rights" mean almost the same thing, but the expression "take liberties (with someone/something)" means something more like "to behave too freely", so you could use the two words together in that particular context.
     

    Lauriso

    New Member
    Latvian
    Indeed, in this context it means "behave so freely", as in the neighbour acts as if we're close friends.
     
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