afin d'aider les plus hésitants

mmonroe88

Senior Member
USA
vietnamese
I kind of figure out this is equivalent to 'in order to help those unsure' in English but just want to check with the forum to be sure

or 'in order to help those still hesitant'
 
  • mmonroe88

    Senior Member
    USA
    vietnamese
    Please see the context below:

    Durant 2 mois, je publierai ici quotidiennement des conseils pratiques et des témoignages d'enseignants de tout âge , niveau ou discipline, afin d'aider les plus hésitants. N'hésitez pas à y participer en laissant vos commentaires et en posant vos questions
     

    mmonroe88

    Senior Member
    USA
    vietnamese
    The 'plus' which means 'more' in its usual sense but in this context can it be understoo d as 'still' as in 'still hesitant'?
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    I can't think of anything better in English (as a single-word equivalent adjective) than the most undecided/uncertain, as offered above by SwissPete and RomainHMM . However, it sounds like a translation and is not very idiomatic in English. May I suggest:
    " ... je publierai ici quotidiennement des conseils pratiques et des témoignages ... afin d'aider les plus hésitants."
    " ........... for those who feel they could benefit from it." Okay, it's not a direct translation, but in our political-correctness-gone-mad language these days, this turn of phrase avoids "stigmatizing" people for anything at all (as if hesitancy is some sort of crime) and instead, offers it as an opportunity for self-improvement (very touchy-feely!).

    And for "N'hésitez pas.." in the next sentence, I hope you're going to use the very idiomatic "Please feel free to ...." ;)
     

    mmonroe88

    Senior Member
    USA
    vietnamese
    It is this word 'plus'/'the most' that troubles me because in English we don't say like this 'the most hesitant' in this context. In English, we may simply say 'in order to help those hesitant/unsure/undecided' or if we want say more emphatically, then we may say 'still hesitant'. In this context and in English, we never want to direct the message to 'the most hesitant' as if there is such a 'the plain hesitant vs 'the most hesitant'. In a nutshell, why use 'plus'?
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Hello,

    I realize that this thread is now nearly a week old, but here's my two cents.

    I agree with Enquiring mind. I think an adapt, rather than a translation, would fit better here, and I like his solution.

    I could be wrong, but my understanding of les plus hésitants, since there is a mention of teachers/practical advice : those who are less at ease / ill assured.
    In this sense of the word :
    Qui dénote de l’hésitationfaible, mal assuré, vacillant.
    which isn't exactly the same as "undecided/uncertain". But as I said, I may be misreading the context.

    We wouldn't say : Les hésitants ... hence the addition of plus. That is : ceux qui sont plus hésitants (moins à l'aise/sûrs)... que les autres.
    Without « plus » , we'd say : Ceux qui hésitent encore... and that's your "still hesitant". :)

     
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