After 8-hour cooking that's all what I needed

cfu507

Senior Member
Hebrew
Please tell me how you would say:

This drink freshened me. After 8-hour cooking that's all what I needed.
 
  • cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thanks, what if there is more than a drink:

    She gave me a cold lemonade and a delicious cake. After eight hours of cooking, ???? what I needed

    Is the word ALL unnecessary?
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    We don't say "all what I needed" in English. Some alternatives would be "just what I needed", with just meaning "exactly", or "everything I needed", if you want to emphasize the completeness of meeting your needs rather than the precision.
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thank you Nun :)
    What would you add in my second sentence? Here it is again:

    She gave me a cold lemonade and a delicious cake. After eight hours of cooking, ???? what I needed.

    it's, those're....
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    "After eight hours of cooking, they're what I needed" OR
    "After eight hours of cooking, they're just what I needed"

    The use of "all" in this context would not be idiomatic. It wouldn't be grammatically incorrect, however. If the context is appropriate, it would be used in this way:

    "After eight hours of cooking, they're all that I needed"
     

    Nunty

    Modified
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    I would say "it was just what I needed". I think it refers to the lemonade-and-cake as a unit.

    By the way, I would only say "a" delicious cake if it was the whole cake. :D
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    A side note: "was all I needed" is an idiom, but it means the opposite of what you want to say here.

    "After 8 hours of cooking, ironing 8 shirts was all I needed!" (Meaning that you didn't need it at all; in fact, it was too much to expect you to do that as well.)

    "Just what I needed" is what I would be most likely to say in the situation you describe, as was suggested above.
     
    Last edited:

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "After eight hours of cooking, they're what I needed" OR
    "After eight hours of cooking, they're just what I needed"
    I have two problems with these suggestions: one, I would not use they, even though two things are referred to; and two, I would definitely not use the present tense, as the situation described happened in the past.

    She gave me some cold lemonade and a slice of cake. After eight hours of working, it was just what I needed. (as has been suggested)

    An idiomatic expression that could be used here is hit the spot:

    After eight hours of working, they really hit the spot. (Here, they doesn't bother me as much.)
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I have two problems with these suggestions: one, I would not use they, even though two things are referred to; and two, I would definitely not use the present tense, as the situation described happened in the past.
    The picture in my mind was that he had just now scarfed down the cake and drained the lemonade. Draining the glass and plunking it on the table, he says "They're/that's just what I needed". In this scenario of immediacy, I could hear many people using the present tense.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    The picture in my mind was that he had just now scarfed down the cake and drained the lemonade. Draining the glass and plunking it on the table, he says "They're/that's just what I needed". In this scenario of immediacy, I could hear many people using the present tense.
    Yes, I agree, but I still wouldn't use "they."
     

    Ms Missy

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Another suggestion:

    She gave me some cold lemonade and a slice of cake. After eight hours of working, that was just what I needed.

    On second thought, there could be a bit of sarcasm suggested when we consider someone working eight hours straight, only to be served a meal consisting of lemonade and cake.
     
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