After all, it <might not rain> I hope it <won't>.

Tenacious Learner

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello teachers,
Eg.
Peter: After all, it might not rain today.
Mary: I hope it won't.

Am I right in my asumptions?
According to Peter the implication is that it's expected to rain, but it could not rain after all.
According to Mary her hope is that it won't rain. There's no uncertainty in her words.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Yes, I also agree, although there is certain uncertainty :D in Mary's words. After all, no hope could pass as firm knowledge...
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I sort of agree with the others, overall.

    Peter's "after all" doesn't sound idiomatic to me, though, in the context, TL.
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I sort of agree with the others, overall.

    Peter's "after all" doesn't sound idiomatic to me, though, in the context, TL.
    Let's imagine that the day before the weather forecast was heavy rains and today it doesn't look like it's going to rain. Will "after all" fit in that context?

    TL
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    "after all" really doesn't fit for me, the way you used it, but I think I understand what you mean now. I'd include a "maybe".

    Maybe it won't rain today after all. (You need the future tense here, TL.)
     

    Tenacious Learner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    "after all" really doesn't fit for me, the way you used it, but I think I understand what you mean now. I'd include a "maybe".

    Maybe it won't rain today after all. (You need the future tense here, TL.)
    Thank you, perpend. Then, I'd better not use "after all" in the sentence. The idea is to include "may not".

    TL
     
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