After all (that) you guys (have) been through

ziawj2

Senior Member
Chinese

In this sentence, I think "through" is used wrongly, and "that" is not necessary.
After all that you guys been through together, finally you are going to get married.

Is it better to say "After all you guys have been through together, and finally you are going to get married"?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It's not "through" that has been used incorrectly, but the supporting words. I would expect your version, with or without "that," depending on the speaker's/writer's preference.

    And your version strikes me as not quite right because of the "and" after the comma. I would phrase it this way.

    After all (that) you guys have been through together, you are finally going to get married.
    After all (that) you guys have been through together, you are finally getting married.


    You can also replace "all" with "everything."

    Finally, in conversation I think we could use your version, but only if we understood there was a long, musing pause after the first half of the sentence:

    After all you guys have been through together ... (insert thoughtful, silent musing) ... and finally you are going to get married
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    "Been through" is also a phrasal verb. It means "endured" or "experienced" (depending on the context). It can also mean "examined" in a different context, but that's completely different from your sentence.

    The "that" helps to distinguish "all" meaning "everything" from "all you guys", meaning a large group of people.

    The "after all" here is not the same as "after all", the phrase.

    In other words, it could be paraphrased as:

    "After everything that you have endured/suffered/experienced together, you are going to get married at last."
     

    ziawj2

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    "Been through" is also a phrasal verb. It means "endured" or "experienced" (depending on the context). It can also mean "examined" in a different context, but that's completely different from your sentence.
    Do you mean I need not to add the word "have" before "been through"? I looked the Colins, and did not find the usage as you said.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Do you mean I need not to add the word "have" before "been through"? I looked the Colins, and did not find the usage as you said.
    You do need to add "have" before "been through", ziawj2.

    "Been", here, is acting as a past participle of "go" (as in I have been to London.) Here's what the WR English dictionary says about go through:

    go through

    1 undergo (a difficult period or experience).
    2 search through or examine carefully.
    3 be officially approved or completed.
    4 informal use up or spend.

    The meaning in your sentence is meaning 1.
     

    ziawj2

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    You do need to add "have" before "been through", ziawj2.

    "Been", here, is acting as a past participle of "go" (as in I have been to London.) Here's what the WR English dictionary says about go through:

    go through

    1 undergo (a difficult period or experience).
    2 search through or examine carefully.
    3 be officially approved or completed.
    4 informal use up or spend.

    The meaning in your sentence is meaning 1.
    Thank you very much!
     
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