after doing something/after having done something

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ywf

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi, all. I'm again asking another question here.:)

I wonder which sentence below is correct:

You'll be allowed to play the computer after finishing your homework.
You'll be allowed to play the computer after having finished your homework.


I find both of the two phrases are occasionally seen: "after doing something" and "after having done something".

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:
  • reveur78

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    Hi, all. I'm again asking another question here.:)

    I wonder which sentence below is correct:

    You'll be allowed to play the computer after finishing your homework.
    You'll be allowed to play the computer after having finished your homework.


    I find both of the two phrases are occasionally seen: "after doing sth." and "after having done sth."

    Thanks in advance!
    I think they are both correct but the second one sounds a little awkward to me.
    Also, I would say "play on the computer".
    Do the native speakers agree?
     

    ADCS

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    The second is not exactly right, but the reasoning for that delves into the depths of English grammar.

    Past perfect tenses are tough, and most English speakers don't even get them right. However, as you probably know, "after" puts you into a prepositional phrase. Perfect gerunds ("having finished") generally have no place in prepositional phrases.

    Past perfect gerunds also are very formal, and archaic in most forms of English. Only use them if you want to indicate you're educated, never in general conversation.
     

    ywf

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Thank you all for your good explanation! Also, thanks to cycloneviv for pointing out the abbreviation issue outside of my question. I didn't notice the rule, but I don't have permission to edit the title, hope the administrator will do it.
     

    xxAxx

    Senior Member
    English
    I don't the second one it gramatically incorrect, but it sounds very awkward, as if the tenses don't agree.
     
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