After finishing his program to enthusiastic cheers

wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

After finishing his program to enthusiastic cheers of the supportive, predominantly Russian audience , Abbott spoke about the sequence of events, his debt to the crowd and his feeling, on balance, of yet another Olympic program gone wrong.
(‘I’m proud of my effort,’ Jeremy Abbott says by Liz Clarke: http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/olympics/wp/2014/02/13/im-proud-of-my-effort-jeremy-abbott-says/)

Could you tell me what the "to" means, and which word the "on" and "of" are connected to?
 
  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    After finishing, the supportive and predominantly Russian audience showed its support by cheering enthusiastically.

    I'll let someone else explain the usage of the words "on" and "of", but it seems to me to be a "list" of things Abbot spoke about;

    Abbot spoke:
    - about the sequence of events
    - (about) his debt to the crowd and his feeling
    - on balance
    - of yet another program gone wrong
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "On balance" is a set phrase meaning "considering both (or all) aspects or points of view".

    I'm not sure about the use of "of" here. I don't know whether the program actually went wrong (in the opinion of the judges). If it did, I might have used "about" again. If it didn't, then "his feeling of another program gone wrong" actually means his personal feeling that the program had gone wrong. It's admittedly a bit confusing!
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    After finishing his program to enthusiastic cheers of the supportive, predominantly Russian audience , Abbott spoke about the sequence of events, his debt to the crowd and his feeling, on balance, of yet another Olympic program gone wrong.
    The final 'of' is unusual but makes sense in a way.

    Here's my interpretation:

    After finishing his program to [the sounds of] enthusiastic cheers from the supportive (predominantly Russian) audience, Abbott spoke about
    (a) the sequence of events,
    (b) his debt to the crowd and
    (c) his feeling that , on balance, yet another Olympic program had gone wrong.

    Does that help?
     
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    wanabee

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much, MattiasNYC, Parla, and Biffo!
    I see. He continued skating, even after he had fallen, to the sounds of cheers from the audience.
    After finishing his program to enthusiastic cheers of the supportive, predominantly Russian audience , Abbott spoke about the sequence of events, his debt to the crowd and his feeling, on balance, of yet another Olympic program gone wrong.
    If you wrote "about yet another Olympic program gone wrong" instead of using "of", is it still possible to connect "his feeling" and "yet another Olympic program gone wrong"?
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank you very much, MattiasNYC, Parla, and Biffo!
    I see. He continued skating, even after he had fallen, to the sounds of cheers from the audience.
    If you wrote "about yet another Olympic program gone wrong" instead of using "of", is it still possible to connect "his feeling" and "yet another Olympic program gone wrong"?
    Yes absolutely. :thumbsup: It would change the meaning but it makes absolute sense.
     
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