After six years, it's only a bit more than half

  • gazrj01

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    After sticking it out for for years, only 10% graduate. But for those who persevere, perhaps repeat subjects and stay for six years, then a bit more than 50% of those students will graduate.

    That's the way I interpret it. It's awkwardly written, that's the problem.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    After sticking it out for for years, only 10% graduate. But for those who persevere, perhaps repeat subjects and stay for six years, then a bit more than 50% of those students will graduate.

    That's the way I interpret it. It's awkwardly written, that's the problem.
    No, the regular undergraduate degree is expected to take 4 years. However, for various reasons,* students are taking longer than that to complete their degrees, or they are not completing the degrees at all.

    *The article is about an effort being made to identify the problems students face by talking to the students who drop out -- who don't complete their degrees at all. The hope is that once these impediments to graduation are identified, people can takes steps to remove them.
     

    gazrj01

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    I think that is more or less what I said, Cagey, only phrased differently. We are both agreeing that for those who stay 4 years (the expected length of the degree) only 10% graduate. For those who stay longer, about 50% graduate after 6 years of study.

    "Just 10 percent of students graduate from this public university in four years. After six years, it's only a bit more than half.

    Think about that — of 100 students who enrolled four years ago, only 10 will walk across the stage this year."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I understood you to be saying that the people who stayed longer were in programs that required more years of study.
    All these students are in the same program, working toward the same 4-year degree.

    But perhaps I misunderstood you.

    Edit: My apologies. I was responding to the post below without noticing that you had eidted it while I was writing my post:
    It means that if the course runs for 4 years (regular undergraduate degree), only 10% graduate. If it is a six-year course , then a bit more than 50% graduate from those courses (probably medicine or law).
     
    Last edited:

    gazrj01

    Senior Member
    English - Australian
    No there is a misunderstanding. What I meant is what you surmise. Same students in same degree. Having taught in a University for 15 years, I understand the problem quite well. However, the failure to complete rate astounds me. In my country a dropout rate of 15% is unacceptable, and the degree coordinator must explain the reasons for losing 1 in 6 students.
     
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