After <taking/ having taken> his master's degree,he applied for a job.

< Previous | Next >

nopainnogain

New Member
Turkish
I find something else confusing about Participles

Present Participle is used to refer Simple Present or Simple Past. It could refer Present Continuous or Past Continuous as well.
He always says goodbye before leaving. (before he leaves)
He used to say goodbye before leaving. (before he left)

Perfect Participle is used to refer Present Perfect or Past Perfect.
Having taken his master's degree,he will apply a job. (After he has taken..)
Having taken his master's degree,he applied a job. (After he had taken..)

But The book called Grammarway says the sentences above have the same meaning,so
we can use both two participles here.I have difficulty understanding.

After taking his master's degree,he applied for a job.
After having taken his master's degree,he applied for a job.






Thanks in advance :)
 
Last edited:
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    1. After taking his master's degree, he applied for a job.
    2. After having taken his master's degree, he applied for a job.

    Your first sentence sounds fine to me.Your second sounds strange because the participial clause is introduced with 'after'. It would be fine without 'after'. I think the pastness is already signalled by 'after' and this renders the perfective redundant.

    Nat
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Normally you apply for a course, rather than a degree, but sometimes people do say 'master's degree' when they mean 'master's degree course'. You also need to add a determiner: my master's degree or a master's degree.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top