After the Crucifixion of Jesus

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Lucy 234

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,
Does "After the Crucifixion of Jesus" mean the same as "When the Crucifixion of Jesus Was Complete/Finished"? Which one is more proper?

After/At the Crucifixion of Jesus, What Did He Mean by Saying “It Is Finished”?
When the Crucifixion of Jesus Was Complete/Finished, What Did He Mean by Saying “It Is Finished”?
 
  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Does "After the Crucifixion of Jesus" :tick: mean the same as "When the Crucifixion of Jesus Was Complete/Finished":cross::tick:? Which one is more proper?
    Yes....they both mean the same thing. More proper? The one I marked with a green sign.

    After/At the Crucifixion of Jesus, What Did He Mean by Saying “It Is Finished”?
    When the Crucifixion of Jesus Was Complete/Finished, What Did He Mean by Saying “It Is Finished”?
    Both "complete:" and "finished" are poor choices. A better term is "Over". (although the entire sentence is sort of unnatural..,,,most native speakers would not say this in this way.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    In ordinary English, Jesus said "It is finished" during his crucifixion. You might use "at" or "at the end of", but "after" makes no sense at all. After his crucifixion, Jesus was (in human terms) dead.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    You might use "at" or "at the end of", but "after" makes no sense at all. After his crucifixion, Jesus was (in human terms) dead.
    I think it refers to the time after he was crucified (nailed to the cross) but before he actually dies. He was supposedly on the cross for about 6 hours. :)
     
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    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think it refers to the time after he was crucified (nailed to the cross) but before he actually dies. He was supposedly on the cross for about 6 hours. :)
    Yes, but the crucifixion refers to all of that time, not just to the action of nailing to the cross, at least in terms of how I have always used the expression.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Yes, but the crucifixion refers to all of that time, not just to the action of nailing to the cross, at least in terms of how I have always used the expression.
    I’m sure a lot of people would agree with you, UJ. However some might argue that the word ‘crucifixion‘ comes from the Latin crucifixio, or crucifixus, meaning "fix to a cross” and refers to the action of nailing of someone to it.

    I had a very strict religious upbringing, but it’s not something I’ve really thought about before. :)
     
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