afterthought, tacked on

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redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
The cold opening flashback seems a little tacked on. Personally, and maybe I am in the minority here, I enjoyed not knowing about what lead up to the zombie infested world we see each week.

http://nerdbastards.com/2011/11/14/the-walking-dead-chupacabra/
This is quoted from a recap & review of Episode 5 of Walking Dead. I sense that there's an overlap in meaning between "tacked on" and "afterthought". Both of them , in my opinion, connote poor planning or little thought given to the opening. If it's correct, I am wondering if "The flashback comes across as an afterthought" could also work in this case.


Tacked on: to add something that you had not planned to add, often without much preparation or thought

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/tack-sth-on#tack-sth-on__2

Afterthought: an idea or plan that was not originally intended

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/american-english/afterthought
 
  • dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Yes, I think the two are strinkingly similar and can be used interchangeably in the context given ("tacked on" being far less formal, to my mind). Also, I think that "As an afterthought" does not always imply that something was done without proper consideration and planning (but I might be well wrong about this) - which, in my experience, is always the case with "tacked on".
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    No, I don't think so. In my opinion, tacked on means something artificially attached to something (text, for example). It could also mean something that somebody decided to use beforehand, before he had the whole sentence or structure of something well thought out.
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think you're on the right track, but, in this particular case, it seems like a joke to say that the opening (the very first scene) of the show is an afterthought (something added later).
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    I think you're on the right track, but, in this particular case, it seems like a joke to say that the opening (the very first scene) of the show is an afterthought (something added later).

    Thanks all. I haven't thought about this before. I agree that it's more likely to say "an afterthought ending". "Afterthought opening" might be a bit odd sounding, borderline oxymoron.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    I've seen "afterthought" being used in a very loose sense in a forum: equivalent to "A isn't that good after experiencing the greatness of B".

    Imagine your friend went into rapture about "Manos: The Hands of Fate", saying that it was the best movie he'd ever seen. You sneered at his ignorance and lent him a copy of "The Shawshank Redemption". He brought it back in after a day, and said:

    "It's official. "The Shawshank Redemption" is the best movie. "Manos: The Hands of Fate" is a complete afterthought."

    Would you use "afterthought" in this way?
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I wouldn't, for what it's worth, but then I'm not a native English speaker so I might be missing something here. It would make some sense to me if "Manos: The Hands of was" was, in some way, based on "The Shawshank Redemption" - or, should I say, was the poor imitation of the latter.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I've never heard of Manos: The Hands of Fate, RG. Is it an imitation of The Shawshank Redemption? If so, no, I wouldn't call it an 'afterthought' ~ I'd call it a pale imitation if it wasn't too bad, a cheap ripoff if it was terrible.
     
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