against vs up against

mycityofsky

Senior Member
Mandarin
Dear all,

is there any difference between the two sentences?

The bed was up against the wall.
The bed was against the wall.

I mean, can I remove the word "up" in it? What's the exact meaning of "up" here?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • HolyUnicorn

    Senior Member
    Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
    Is up against and against completely interchangeable in the three sentences below?



    1) I was sitting in the window seat when this humongous football player sat down next to me. The guy took up a seat and a half. I was literally pinned (up) against the window.

    2) She pushed the pillows (up) against the wall and lay upon the mattress.

    3) He leaned his head (up) against the window and prayed.
     

    LearnGrammar

    New Member
    Sri Lanka
    But becareful with a certain context that looks like this;

    The plans for the new bridge ran up against strong local opposition.

    “ran up againts” is inseparable, a phrasal verb to mean ‘to experience an unexpected difficulty’.

    Just in case! It may not be important to you! :)
     

    HolyUnicorn

    Senior Member
    Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
    But becareful with a certain context that looks like this;

    The plans for the new bridge ran up against strong local opposition.

    “ran up againts” is inseparable, a phrasal verb to mean ‘to experience an unexpected difficulty’.

    Just in case! It may not be important to you! :)
    Thanks for your help . :rolleyes: , LearnGrammar. Good to know that. However, in my sentences, regarding the literal meaning of (up) against, is there any difference? According to Merriam Webster, "up against" means" placed so as to be touching (something)". If something is "against" something else, it also touches that thing. I cannot see any difference between up against and against. :confused:
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    However, in my sentences, regarding the literal meaning of (up) against, is there any difference? According to Merriam Webster, "up against" means" placed so as to be touching (something)". If something is "against" something else, it also touches that thing. I cannot see any difference between up against and against. :confused:
    “Up” sounds odd and unnecessary to me in all three of your sentences.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    To my British ear, "up against the wall" sounds more squashed than "against the wall" in the first sentence.
    1) I was sitting in the window seat when this humongous football player sat down next to me. The guy took up a seat and a half. I was literally pinned (up) against the window.

    In the second, I imagine that the pillows are in an upright position, as well as being against the wall.
    2) She pushed the pillows (up) against the wall and lay upon the mattress.

    I don't really see what position is suggested in (3). "Up" seems to be redundant, or confusing.
    3) He leaned his head (up) against the window and prayed.
     
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