agency for <qualiting/qualitative> PR

DanStyle

Member
Russian
Hello everyone, I am writing a sentence and I am confused a bit.

I know (I remember it)that erbs that follow words like 'about', 'of', 'in', at', etc always take 'ing'.

But I still not sure, how I should write:

1) I would hire an advertising agency for qualiting PR?
2) I would hire an advertising agency for qualitative PR?

How I should write grammatically?
Kind regards.
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    What do you mean by "qualitative PR"? I suspect that you have not understood how this word is used.
     

    DanStyle

    Member
    Russian
    'Quality' isn't a verb, so can't take -ing.

    Your second example is fine though, as long as you remove the question mark.
    0hisa2me

    Thank you very much! Only verbs can take -ing form?

    What do you mean by "qualitative PR"? I suspect that you have not understood how this word is used.
    Andygc

    I wanted to write sentence: "I would hire an advertising agency for qualitative PR".
     
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    bennymix

    Senior Member
    The original question seemed to be about whether certain prepositions--for, about, in-- when followed by a verb, require the ing-form of that verb.

    Do you have this sort of thing in mind, Dan? "I want to talk to you about swimming [in your pool]."
    "I'm interested in following up our conversation."

    I don't understand the advertising example, but one might be, "I'd hire an agency for doing high-quality PR work."

    I don't understand why you ask about 'quality' or what your question about that word is. I thought the question was about ing-forms.
     

    DanStyle

    Member
    Russian
    bennymix

    I will try to explain my thoughts :) Sorry for bad English.

    I did a lesson, where I shoud write how would I advertise my company. "I would hire an advertising agency for qualitative PR" - this sentence is from my lesson. I wrote this sentence and I wanted to say that first of all I will do a good PR for my company.

    I don't understand why you ask about 'quality' or what your question about that word is. I thought the question was about ing-forms.
    In this sentece: "I would hire an advertising agency for qualitative PR" , who was written by me, I didn't know what ending should I write at the end of the word "quality"

    You have written:
    prepositions--for, about, in-- when followed by a verb, require the ing-form of that verb.
    -- I wanted to write the word "quality" with ing-form, - "qualitying"


    "I would hire an advertising agency for qualiting PR?<< This situation are confused me, because I remember that after all preposition I must add "ing-form"

    I didn't find word "qualitying" at the internet. I thought that if I wrote the word "qualitying" with ing-enging it would be wrong.

    So I asked the question and user 0hisa2me wrote me, that
    'Quality' isn't a verb, so can't take -ing.
    I asked the question: I should write "ing" form only after verbs?
    Kind regards,
    Danil
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, the -ing ending is for verbs. I am going; "He was talking."

    This verb form of -ing can be used as an adjective: "I have a talking parrot." or used as a noun "The burning of the rubbish created a lot of smoke." But it must come from a verb.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    There is actually such a thing as qualitative PR, but it is not what the poster wants to say.

    The words qualitative and quantitative are used in contrast to each other. Something is quantitative if it involves numbers (quantities), qualitative if it is not. PR activity that is based on numerical analysis of target markets and audiences, television and radio audience sizes, focus group tests and other numerical evaluations would be quantitative PR. PR activity that is based on what someone thinks will work, perhaps based on a lot of useful experience but without such analysis, would be qualitative PR.

    So, this term has a real meaning, but don't use it here.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Partial quote from Dan, post #7.
    In this sentence: "I would hire an advertising agency for qualitative PR" , who was written by me, I didn't know what ending should I write at the end of the word "quality"

    You have written: [BM:] prepositions--for, about, in-- when followed by a verb, require the ing-form of that verb.




    -- I wanted to write the word "quality" with ing-form, - "qualitying"


    "I would hire an advertising agency for qualiting PR?<< This situation are confused me, because I remember that after all preposition I must add "ing-form"
    ===
    Yes, you might hire an agency to do something. I hired XYZ for conducting market research. I hired Jack for mowing my lawns.

    There are ing form of verbs being used here, although the infinitive also works.

    Now, Quality, is not a verb; it's a noun (or adj). Hence I cannot say, apart from the specific question at hand. A "I quality this job." :cross:
    B "He qualitied his work for the government." :cross:

    Nor are there ing forms.
    C He was qualitying his work for the government when he had a heart attack.":cross:

    IF you are doing quality work, then the correct version of B, is B*: He did [high] quality work for the government."

    IF there is such a thing as "quality PR" or if you simply mean 'high quality PR', then it's something done or conducted.

    "He did quality PR for our firm."

    The same point applies to "qualitative PR"; it's something done. To bring in an ing form, there has to be a verb.

    "I hired him for conducting qualitative PR for the company."
     
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