agree in / on / with / to

Seyle

Member
España (español)
En una autorización para utilizar una tarjeta de crédito para realizar una reserva en un hotel:

I, [name&surname], authorise [name&surname] to use my credit card number to make a reservation at [hotel name] Hotel in [town name] (Greece) for a two-night stay from 15 to 20 august 2008.

Después, querría escribir algo como:

I allow him/her to
withdraw a deposit of 90 euros in case of absence the date agreed.

El problema es que desconozco si la persona de contacto es un hombre o una mujer, así que he pensado utilizar agree, pero no sé cómo se construye la frase exactamente, y con qué preposición:

I agree in withdrawing a deposit of 90 euros in case of absence the date agreed.

Pero me suena un poco raro, no se dice de quién se trata. Tampoco me gusta repetir el verbo agree dos veces. ¿Se os ocurre otra forma de escribirlo?

 
  • FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The meaning of the sentence is unclear to me - I'm not sure who the him/her is referring to. Are you giving the hotel permission to charge 90 euros to your card if the person making the reservation does not show up? If so, you could say, "I agree to the charging of 90 euros to my credit card in the event the reservation is not used." or "I authorize the hotel to charge 90 euros to my credit card in the event the reservation is not used."
     

    Seyle

    Member
    España (español)
    Exactly, I meant that. I'm sorry if it was not very clear.

    Him/her is the person responsible in the hotel.

    Thank you for your help, it was important not to make a mistake and change the meaning of the sentence!
     

    Kraken

    Senior Member
    Castellano (Español)
    Anyway, when you are not sure whether the subject is a man or a woman, you can use "they", and "them" as an object.

    "If someone arrives late, I won't let them in".
    ;)
     
    Anyway, when you are not sure whether the subject is a man or a woman, you can use "they",and "them" as an object.

    "If someone arrives late, I won't let them in".
    ;)
    Hello, Kraken:
    Just for the record, the use of "they" and "them" when one does not know the gender of the subject has become acceptable for informal occasions.
    However, in formal settings, he or she is still correct. The Chicago Book of Style agrees with the Associated Press Stylebook (two of the most-used style guides on American English) which states:
    In cases where a person’s gender is not clear from the first name or from the story’s context, indicate the gender by using he or she in a subsequent reference.

    Also, FYI...Follow these long-established printers’ rules for quotation mark placement with other punctuation:
    —The period and the comma always go within the quotation marks.
    —The dash, the colon, the semicolon, the question mark and the exclamation point go within the quotation marks when they apply to the quoted matter only.
    They go outside when they apply to the whole sentence.

    Believe me, sometimes they can still drive me crazy. I am posting these to be helpful to others; please take them in the spirit they were intended.
     
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