agree to do/doing

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi, there

I would like to know if I should use "agree to do" or agree to doing" in the following example:

"Are we all agreed to do this?"
or
"Are we all agreed to doing this?"

or maybe "Are we agreed with doing this?"?

?


Thank you very much, really.
 
Last edited:
  • Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "Have we all agreed to do this?"

    And, as you were advised in #2, "Are we all agreed on doing this?"

    I can't think of a sentence or context in which "agreed to doing" would be correct.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    "Have we all agreed to do this?"

    And, as you were advised in #2, "Are we all agreed on doing this?"

    I can't think of a sentence or context in which "agreed to doing" would be correct.
    Ok, but what's the difference between saying "agree to do" or "agree on doing"? Please, Florentia

    Thank you a lot
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I don't see any difference, in the sentences I provided, in a context where a group of people are developing a plan of action.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The thing is that "agree to raising revenue" (the raising of revenue) is clearly more noun-like than "agree to doing the right thing", where "doing" is more verb-like - it would seem to mean "agreed to having done the right thing".

    He agreed to do the right thing. (Here the gerund participle is not possible.)
    He agreed to raise revenue. (He will raise revenue)
    He agreed to raising revenue. (We don't know who is going to raise revenue, but he agreed in principle).
     
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