agreed to recently

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sakura124

Member
Japanese
Hi, thanks for reading:)

I was reading an article about the tea industry in Assam, India:I got stuck with the following sentence.

As a result, firms in Assam are resisting calls from activists and student leaders to lift the daily wage of tea workers from about $2 agreed to recently, blaming weak prices and the doubling of crop expenses over the past 10 years.

The part I'm having trouble with is written in bold:
what did they (tea companies and their employees, presumably) agree to exactly?
To raise the workers' wages from $2, or to pay $2 as their wages?
I can't fully grasp the grammatical structure of this sentence, so it would be really helpful if
someone could explain that, too!!

Thanks!
 
  • sakura124

    Member
    Japanese
    Hi GinevraD, thanks a lot for your comment!

    I understand that the wages are $2 now and they have agreed to raise it
    Following what you say, it would mean the companies have decided to pay $2 earlier, and then agreed to pay more recently.

    That was my first thought too actually, then I came up with another possibility:confused::
    that they have agreed to pay $2 recently (thus the wages were even less until recently),
    and now they are refusing to make the pay raise for the second time in a short period of time.

    My hunch is the former as GinevraD says.
    Can anybody else comment to help clarify??
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    The way I read it, the $2 was agreed to recently (and the wage was even less prior to that). But is the dollar the currency in India? If not, the wage should have been stated in the local currency, with the dollar equivalent given in parentheses.
     

    sakura124

    Member
    Japanese
    Hi Parla, thanks a lot for your comment!

    I agree the currency should have been given in the local currency (Rupee, I understand) with the dollar equivalent in parentheses. I imagine they made it like this because it is an article for an English Newspaper published in Japan, thus they omitted the local currency as few people would know its value.

    The way I read it, the $2 was agreed to recently (and the wage was even less prior to that). But is the dollar the currency in India? If not, the wage should have been stated in the local currency, with the dollar equivalent given in parentheses.
     

    GinevraD

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Latin America
    But then why say "to lift [...] from about $2? - that is why I got a different meaning ... Shouldn't it then be To lift [it, them] to about $2.
     

    sakura124

    Member
    Japanese
    Hi again, thanks for your comment GinevraD!

    I imagine Parla is saying that the pay had been less than $2, then they recently agreed they will raise it to $2, and now the activists and student leaders are suggesting it should be raised even higher.

    Sorry if I misunderstood you, Parla:(

    But then why say "to lift [...] from about $2? - that is why I got a different meaning ... Shouldn't it then be To lift [it, them] to about $2.
     

    GinevraD

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Latin America
    I imagine Parla is saying that the pay had been less than $2, then they recently agreed they will raise it to $2, and now the activists and student leaders are suggesting it should be raised even higher.
    I'm still getting a different meaning. It would be great if @Parla will respond and give us her opinion.
    My understanding is that they have agreed to raise wages from about $2. to higher ones, but the activists are complaining that the company has not complied with that agreement...
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Firms in Arram are resisting calls to lift the wage from $2 (to increase the wage above $2). What $2 wage? The $2 wage that was agreed to recently.
    They have already agreed to $2. They are resisting the idea of raising it further.
     

    sakura124

    Member
    Japanese
    I'm still getting a different meaning. It would be great if @Parla will respond and give us her opinion.
    My understanding is that they have agreed to raise wages from about $2. to higher ones, but the activists are complaining that the company has not complied with that agreement...

    Firms in Arram are resisting calls to lift the wage from $2 (to increase the wage above $2). What $2 wage? The $2 wage that was agreed to recently.
    They have already agreed to $2. They are resisting the idea of raising it further.
    Hi GinevraD and Myridon, thanks a lot for your comments!

    Reading both your comments and the previous ones, I now feel Myridon's interpretation is the most appropriate: the $2 was agreed to recently (meaning they are now paying $2 to the workers), but the company has not yet agreed to raise it still further.

    I still am not 100% confident, though:it would be great if Parla can give us her opinion, as GinevraD says...
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    The sentence could have been worded better. I had to read it three or four times, but I've come to the same conclusion Myridon did.
     

    sakura124

    Member
    Japanese
    The sentence could have been worded better. I had to read it three or four times, but I've come to the same conclusion Myridon did.
    Hi RM1(SS), thanks for your comment!

    I agree this sentence is not written too well. Shame, because it is from one of the most well-known
    English newspapers published in Japan:confused:
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I agree with Myridon about what the sentence is saying, but it doesn't make a lot of sense. If wages were raised "recently", it goes without saying that employers are going to resist another raise (unless there had been some kind of agreement that there would be a further raise in the near future.)
     

    sakura124

    Member
    Japanese
    I agree with Myridon about what the sentence is saying, but it doesn't make a lot of sense. If wages were raised "recently", it goes without saying that employers are going to resist another raise (unless there had been some kind of agreement that there would be a further raise in the near future.)
    Hi velisarius, thanks for your comment!

    As far as I could see from reading the article in whole, there was nothing that explains
    why they were talking about a yet another raise in such a short time:(
     
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